Community Wellness and Safety

The Government of the Northwest Territories has made
64 commitments
under this theme.
37
Fulfilled
27
In Progress
0
Planning
  • Commitment Progress Markers
    • Fulfilled
    • In Progress
    • Planning
  • Milestone Progress Markers
    • Fulfilled
    • In Progress
    • Planning
  • Commitment
    • 2016
    • 2017
    • 2018
    • 2019
Focusing on mental health and addictions by ensuring that services are delivered locally with culturally appropriate methods.
4.1.1
To enhance access to culturally-appropriate programs and services, we will develop a comprehensive mental health and addictions framework that:
 
Prioritizes improvements to outpatient mental health services, with a particular focus on youth mental health services in schools and the broader community.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.1: To enhance access to culturally-appropriate programs and services we will develop a comprehensive mental health and addictions framework that:

  • Prioritizes improvements to outpatient mental health services with a particular focus on youth mental health services in schools and the broader community;
  • Addresses gaps in integrated community-based services; and
  • Enhances treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

In addition we will:

  • Evaluate our land-based wellness programs;
  • Pilot and evaluate mobile addictions treatment options; and
  • Compile baseline data so that government can be better held to account for the performance of mental health and addictions services.

The Department has established a focus on mental health and addictions to contribute towards overall community wellness and safety. On November 2nd, 2016, The Mind and Spirit Mental Health and Addictions Strategic Framework was tabled to guide work in the area from 2016 – 2021.

The framework sets the stage for the development of three action plans (Mental Health, Addictions, and Children & Youth Mental Wellness) that will prioritize improvements to outpatient services with a focus on youth mental health services in the schools and communities, address gaps in integrated community based services and enhance treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

The first of these Action Plans, the Child and Youth Mental Wellness Action Plan was tabled during the Fall Session of 2017. It outlines five major objectives: improving mental health literacy among children, youth and families; fostering a supportive environment to protect the mental wellness of children and youth; creating a capable and skilled community of adults to support the mental wellness of children and youth; improving access to mental wellness services and programs for children and youth and improving mental wellness programs and services through the use of locally relevant data and perspectives.

The Addictions and Recovery and Mental Health Action Plans are expected to be completed in 2018.

Review of the Expert Panel is concluded
Finalize and release Mental Health Strategic Framework
Develop Child and Youth Mental Health and Addictions Action Plan
Develop Territorial Mental Wellness Action Plan
Develop Territorial Addictions Recovery Action Plan
Implement 2017/18 actions outlined in Action Plans
 
Addresses gaps in integrated community-based services.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.1: To enhance access to culturally-appropriate programs and services we will develop a comprehensive mental health and addictions framework that:

  • Prioritizes improvements to outpatient mental health services with a particular focus on youth mental health services in schools and the broader community;
  • Addresses gaps in integrated community-based services; and
  • Enhances treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

In addition we will:

  • Evaluate our land-based wellness programs;
  • Pilot and evaluate mobile addictions treatment options; and
  • Compile baseline data so that government can be better held to account for the performance of mental health and addictions services.

The Department has established a focus on mental health and addictions to contribute towards overall community wellness and safety. On November 2nd, 2016, The Mind and Spirit Mental Health and Addictions Strategic Framework was tabled to guide work in the area from 2016 – 2021.

The framework sets the stage for the development of three action plans (Mental Health, Addictions, and Children & Youth Mental Wellness) that will prioritize improvements to outpatient services with a focus on youth mental health services in the schools and communities, address gaps in integrated community based services and enhance treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

The first of these Action Plans, the Child and Youth Mental Wellness Action Plan was tabled during the Fall Session of 2017. It outlines five major objectives: improving mental health literacy among children, youth and families; fostering a supportive environment to protect the mental wellness of children and youth; creating a capable and skilled community of adults to support the mental wellness of children and youth; improving access to mental wellness services and programs for children and youth and improving mental wellness programs and services through the use of locally relevant data and perspectives.

The Addictions and Recovery and Mental Health Action Plans are expected to be completed in 2018.

 

Review of the Expert Panel is concluded
Finalize and release Mental Health Strategic Framework
Develop Child and Youth Mental Health and Addictions Action Plan
Develop Territorial Mental Wellness Action Plan
Develop Territorial Addictions Recovery Action Plan
Implement 2017/18 actions outlined in Action Plans
 
Evaluates our land-based addictions healing programs.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.1: To enhance access to culturally-appropriate programs and services we will develop a comprehensive mental health and addictions framework that:

  • Prioritizes improvements to outpatient mental health services with a particular focus on youth mental health services in schools and the broader community;
  • Addresses gaps in integrated community-based services; and
  • Enhances treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

In addition we will:

  • Evaluate our land-based wellness programs;
  • Pilot and evaluate mobile addictions treatment options; and
  • Compile baseline data so that government can be better held to account for the performance of mental health and addictions services.

The Department has established a focus on mental health and addictions to contribute towards overall community wellness and safety. On November 2nd, 2016, The Mind and Spirit Mental Health and Addictions Strategic Framework was tabled to guide work in the area from 2016 – 2021.

The framework sets the stage for the development of three action plans (Mental Health, Addictions, and Children & Youth Mental Wellness) that will prioritize improvements to outpatient services with a focus on youth mental health services in the schools and communities, address gaps in integrated community based services and enhance treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

The first of these Action Plans, the Child and Youth Mental Wellness Action Plan was tabled during the Fall Session of 2017. It outlines five major objectives: improving mental health literacy among children, youth and families; fostering a supportive environment to protect the mental wellness of children and youth; creating a capable and skilled community of adults to support the mental wellness of children and youth; improving access to mental wellness services and programs for children and youth and improving mental wellness programs and services through the use of locally relevant data and perspectives.

The Addictions and Recovery and Mental Health Action Plans are expected to be completed in 2018.

Work with one Aboriginal government to develop an evaluation approach
Evaluate one land-based addiction healing program with Aboriginal governments
Establish ongoing evaluation approach
 
Models a mobile addictions treatment team.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.1: To enhance access to culturally-appropriate programs and services we will develop a comprehensive mental health and addictions framework that:

  • Prioritizes improvements to outpatient mental health services with a particular focus on youth mental health services in schools and the broader community;
  • Addresses gaps in integrated community-based services; and
  • Enhances treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

In addition we will:

  • Evaluate our land-based wellness programs;
  • Pilot and evaluate mobile addictions treatment options; and
  • Compile baseline data so that government can be better held to account for the performance of mental health and addictions services.

The Department has established a focus on mental health and addictions to contribute towards overall community wellness and safety. On November 2nd, 2016, The Mind and Spirit Mental Health and Addictions Strategic Framework was tabled to guide work in the area from 2016 – 2021.

The framework sets the stage for the development of three action plans (Mental Health, Addictions, and Children & Youth Mental Wellness) that will prioritize improvements to outpatient services with a focus on youth mental health services in the schools and communities, address gaps in integrated community based services and enhance treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

The first of these Action Plans, the Child and Youth Mental Wellness Action Plan was tabled during the Fall Session of 2017. It outlines five major objectives: improving mental health literacy among children, youth and families; fostering a supportive environment to protect the mental wellness of children and youth; creating a capable and skilled community of adults to support the mental wellness of children and youth; improving access to mental wellness services and programs for children and youth and improving mental wellness programs and services through the use of locally relevant data and perspectives.

The Addictions and Recovery and Mental Health Action Plans are expected to be completed in 2018.

Evaluate pilot programs
Assess feasibility of implementing in other communities
 
Enhances treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.1: To enhance access to culturally-appropriate programs and services we will develop a comprehensive mental health and addictions framework that:

  • Prioritizes improvements to outpatient mental health services with a particular focus on youth mental health services in schools and the broader community;
  • Addresses gaps in integrated community-based services; and
  • Enhances treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

In addition we will:

  • Evaluate our land-based wellness programs;
  • Pilot and evaluate mobile addictions treatment options; and
  • Compile baseline data so that government can be better held to account for the performance of mental health and addictions services.

The Department has established a focus on mental health and addictions to contribute towards overall community wellness and safety. On November 2nd, 2016, The Mind and Spirit Mental Health and Addictions Strategic Framework was tabled to guide work in the area from 2016 – 2021.

The framework sets the stage for the development of three action plans (Mental Health, Addictions, and Children & Youth Mental Wellness) that will prioritize improvements to outpatient services with a focus on youth mental health services in the schools and communities, address gaps in integrated community based services and enhance treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

The first of these Action Plans, the Child and Youth Mental Wellness Action Plan was tabled during the Fall Session of 2017. It outlines five major objectives: improving mental health literacy among children, youth and families; fostering a supportive environment to protect the mental wellness of children and youth; creating a capable and skilled community of adults to support the mental wellness of children and youth; improving access to mental wellness services and programs for children and youth and improving mental wellness programs and services through the use of locally relevant data and perspectives.

The Addictions and Recovery and Mental Health Action Plans are expected to be completed in 2018.

Review of the Expert Panel is concluded
Finalize and release Mental Health Strategic Framework
Develop Child and Youth Mental Health and Addictions Action Plan
Develop Territorial Mental Wellness Action Plan
Develop Territorial Addictions Recovery Action Plan
Implement 2017/18 actions outlined in Action Plans
 
Compiles baseline data so that government can be better held to account for the performance of mental health and addictions services.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.1: To enhance access to culturally-appropriate programs and services we will develop a comprehensive mental health and addictions framework that:

  • Prioritizes improvements to outpatient mental health services with a particular focus on youth mental health services in schools and the broader community;
  • Addresses gaps in integrated community-based services; and
  • Enhances treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

In addition we will:

  • Evaluate our land-based wellness programs;
  • Pilot and evaluate mobile addictions treatment options; and
  • Compile baseline data so that government can be better held to account for the performance of mental health and addictions services.

The Department has established a focus on mental health and addictions to contribute towards overall community wellness and safety. On November 2nd, 2016, The Mind and Spirit Mental Health and Addictions Strategic Framework was tabled to guide work in the area from 2016 – 2021.

The framework sets the stage for the development of three action plans (Mental Health, Addictions, and Children & Youth Mental Wellness) that will prioritize improvements to outpatient services with a focus on youth mental health services in the schools and communities, address gaps in integrated community based services and enhance treatment options at local and regional levels, including aftercare.

The first of these Action Plans, the Child and Youth Mental Wellness Action Plan was tabled during the Fall Session of 2017. It outlines five major objectives: improving mental health literacy among children, youth and families; fostering a supportive environment to protect the mental wellness of children and youth; creating a capable and skilled community of adults to support the mental wellness of children and youth; improving access to mental wellness services and programs for children and youth and improving mental wellness programs and services through the use of locally relevant data and perspectives.

The Addictions and Recovery and Mental Health Action Plans are expected to be completed in 2018.

Implement Community Counseling Program Data Monitoring Tool
Collect baseline data and track performance indicators of various programs
 
4.1.2
Taking into account mental health and addictions, we will look at innovative ways to prevent and reduce crime such as integrated case management, wellness courts, domestic violence treatment options courts, and culturally appropriate correctional programs.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.2 – Taking into account mental health and addictions, we will look at innovative ways to prevent and reduce crime such as integrated case management, wellness courts, domestic violence treatment options courts, and culturally appropriate correctional programs.

Integrated Case Management – The ICM Pilot Project aims to create, foster and deliver a coordinated, collaborative, multi-departmental and client-centered approach that removes barriers and service gaps for common clients with complex needs. The ICM Pilot has been accepting clients since October 2015.

Wellness Court – The Wellness Court is an alternative to conventional court that focuses on the offender rather than the offence. It applies a model that seeks to address underlying issues of drug and alcohol addiction, mental illness and cognitive challenges.

Domestic Violence Treatment Options Court – The DVTO Court was implemented on March 24, 2011. It is an option for low-risk offenders who take responsibility for their actions (plead guilty), and agree to attend an eight-module program. Offenders are carefully screened, and are required to attend the eight-module program as ordered by the Court. Successful completion of the program is a mitigating factor in sentencing. Support for victims is available, and may be coordinated through Victim Services. Victim safety is always a key consideration. The DVTO is offered in Yellowknife and Hay River, and is also available to offenders from Behchokǫ̀, K’atl’odeeche and Enterprise.

Corrections Culturally Appropriate Programming – The Department of Justice recognizes that in order to make a difference, programming in correctional facilities must be designed to address an offender’s needs including the root causes that lead an individual to criminal behaviour. Programming must also be delivered in a way that recognizes the importance of culture and the short time that most territorial inmates are incarcerated. The Department’s Corrections Service and its partners offer a range of Indigenous programs designed to help offenders reintegrate back into their communities.

With the support of other social envelope Departments, the Department of Justice is continuing to implement the ICM pilot project in Yellowknife, and is continuing to provide program support for the Wellness Court and DVTO. The Department is also exploring improvements in culturally appropriate correctional programming. Steps undertaken to prevent and reduce crime include begin sittings of the DVTO Court in Behchokǫ̀ (Milestone 1), completing an evaluation of the ICM pilot project (Milestone 2), and deliver new culturally appropriate drug and alcohol programming in correctional (Milestone 3).

Related Mandate Commitments:

  • Commitment 4.4.1 - We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by: Examining the feasibility of expanding DVTO Court beyond Yellowknife and Hay River.

  • Commitment 4.4.1 - We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by: Providing training, public information and outreach on protections provided under the Protection Against Family Violence Act.

  • Commitment 4.4.1 - We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by: Continuing the support for a healing program for men who use violence in intimate relationships such as the Wek’eahkaa A New Day Healing Program.

Begin sittings of the Domestic Violence Treatment Options Court in Behchoko
Complete evaluation of Integrated Case Management pilot project
Deliver new culturally appropriate drug and alcohol programming in corrections
4.1.3
We will enhance support to communities in crisis by providing appropriate responses to suicide, which include:
 
Establishing a support team of headquarters and regional staff, to form a crisis response network that can respond and provide support to communities.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.3 - We will enhance support to communities in crisis by providing appropriate responses to suicide, which includes:

  • Establishing a support team of headquarters and regional staff, to form a crisis response network that can respond and provide support to communities.
  • Providing specialized trauma informed training and critical incidence stress debriefing (CISD) training to the crisis response network.
  • Building surge capacity so there is coverage for team members participating on the network.
  • Utilizing the expertise of the crisis response network team members to promote enhanced suicide intervention activities.
  • Develop a program monitoring framework

The Department will enhance the approach to suicide prevention with the development of a Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response Network. A comprehensive Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response Network (TSPCRN) will take a whole of community approach (involving all relevant community partners) and encompass a focus on prevention, intervention and postvention. In alignment with the Strategic Framework for Mental Health and Addictions Recovery, all activities and initiatives will be trauma informed recovery oriented and culturally relevant.

Establish support team HQ and regional staff
 
Providing specialized trauma informed training and critical incidence stress debriefing (CISD) training to the crisis response network.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.3 - We will enhance support to communities in crisis by providing appropriate responses to suicide, which includes:

  • Establishing a support team of headquarters and regional staff, to form a crisis response network that can respond and provide support to communities.
  • Providing specialized trauma informed training and critical incidence stress debriefing (CISD) training to the crisis response network.
  • Building surge capacity so there is coverage for team members participating on the network.
  • Utilizing the expertise of the crisis response network team members to promote enhanced suicide intervention activities.
  • Develop a program monitoring framework

The Department will enhance the approach to suicide prevention with the development of a Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response Network. A comprehensive Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response Network (TSPCRN) will take a whole of community approach (involving all relevant community partners) and encompass a focus on prevention, intervention and postvention. In alignment with the Strategic Framework for Mental Health and Addictions Recovery, all activities and initiatives will be trauma informed recovery oriented and culturally relevant.

Provide specialized training for crisis response network (ongoing
 
Building surge capacity so there is coverage for team members participating on the network.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.3 - We will enhance support to communities in crisis by providing appropriate responses to suicide, which includes:

  • Establishing a support team of headquarters and regional staff, to form a crisis response network that can respond and provide support to communities.
  • Providing specialized trauma informed training and critical incidence stress debriefing (CISD) training to the crisis response network.
  • Building surge capacity so there is coverage for team members participating on the network.
  • Utilizing the expertise of the crisis response network team members to promote enhanced suicide intervention activities.
  • Develop a program monitoring framework

The Department will enhance the approach to suicide prevention with the development of a Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response Network. A comprehensive Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response Network (TSPCRN) will take a whole of community approach (involving all relevant community partners) and encompass a focus on prevention, intervention and postvention. In alignment with the Strategic Framework for Mental Health and Addictions Recovery, all activities and initiatives will be trauma informed recovery oriented and culturally relevant.

Build surge capacity
 
Utilizing the expertise of the crisis response network team members to promote enhanced suicide intervention activities.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.3 - We will enhance support to communities in crisis by providing appropriate responses to suicide, which includes:

  • Establishing a support team of headquarters and regional staff, to form a crisis response network that can respond and provide support to communities.
  • Providing specialized trauma informed training and critical incidence stress debriefing (CISD) training to the crisis response network.
  • Building surge capacity so there is coverage for team members participating on the network.
  • Utilizing the expertise of the crisis response network team members to promote enhanced suicide intervention activities.
  • Develop a program monitoring framework

The Department will enhance the approach to suicide prevention with the development of a Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response Network. A comprehensive Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response Network (TSPCRN) will take a whole of community approach (involving all relevant community partners) and encompass a focus on prevention, intervention and postvention. In alignment with the Strategic Framework for Mental Health and Addictions Recovery, all activities and initiatives will be trauma informed recovery oriented and culturally relevant.

Promote enhanced suicide intervention activities
 
Developing a program monitoring framework.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.1.3 - We will enhance support to communities in crisis by providing appropriate responses to suicide, which includes:

  • Establishing a support team of headquarters and regional staff, to form a crisis response network that can respond and provide support to communities.
  • Providing specialized trauma informed training and critical incidence stress debriefing (CISD) training to the crisis response network.
  • Building surge capacity so there is coverage for team members participating on the network.
  • Utilizing the expertise of the crisis response network team members to promote enhanced suicide intervention activities.
  • Develop a program monitoring framework

The Department will enhance the approach to suicide prevention with the development of a Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response Network. A comprehensive Territorial Suicide Prevention and Crisis Response Network (TSPCRN) will take a whole of community approach (involving all relevant community partners) and encompass a focus on prevention, intervention and postvention. In alignment with the Strategic Framework for Mental Health and Addictions Recovery, all activities and initiatives will be trauma informed recovery oriented and culturally relevant.

Develop a program monitoring framework
Taking action so that seniors can age in place.
4.2.1
We will support elders to live in their own homes for as long as possible and ensure adequate supports are available for those who can no longer do so, by:
 
Completing a review of existing programs in order to project, over a 20-year period, policy and financial needs.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.2.1: Support elders to live in their own homes for as long as possible and ensure adequate supports are available for those who can no longer do so by:

  • Completing a review of existing programs in order to project over a 20-year period, policy and financial needs;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for enhanced home and community care services;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for expanded palliative care services;
  • Developing financing options for long-term care facilities; and
  • Proposing a regulatory framework for long term-care.

The Department completed a Long-Term Care Program (LTC) Review to assess the needs over the next 20 years. This included developing updated capital projections for long-term care and dementia beds and developing financing options for long-term care facilities along with a regulatory framework for long-term care. http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/nwt-long-term-care-program-review.pdf

There are currently 183 LTC beds in the system with an additional 27 becoming available with the opening of the Jimmy Erasmus Seniors Home and the Norman Wells LTC facility.

Funding has been approved by the Legislative Assembly for an additional 72 beds at the Old Stanton facility, 48 beds in Hay River as well as planning for additional beds in Inuvik.

In 2018, the Department plans to continue work on developing LTC financing options and a regulatory framework proposal.

Conduct review of existing long term care programs
Initiate review of existing home and community care programs and services
 
Developing updated capital projections for long-term care and dementia beds.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.2.1: Support elders to live in their own homes for as long as possible and ensure adequate supports are available for those who can no longer do so by:

  • Completing a review of existing programs in order to project over a 20-year period, policy and financial needs;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for enhanced home and community care services;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for expanded palliative care services;
  • Developing financing options for long-term care facilities; and
  • Proposing a regulatory framework for long term-care.

The Department completed a Long-Term Care Program (LTC) Review to assess the needs over the next 20 years. This included developing updated capital projections for long-term care and dementia beds and developing financing options for long-term care facilities along with a regulatory framework for long-term care. http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/nwt-long-term-care-program-review.pdf

There are currently 183 LTC beds in the system with an additional 27 becoming available with the opening of the Jimmy Erasmus Seniors Home and the Norman Wells LTC facility.

Funding has been approved by the Legislative Assembly for an additional 72 beds at the Old Stanton facility, 48 beds in Hay River as well as planning for additional beds in Inuvik.

In 2018, the Department plans to continue work on developing LTC financing options and a regulatory framework proposal.

Develop updated capital projections
 
Developing financing options for long-term care facilities.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.2.1: Support elders to live in their own homes for as long as possible and ensure adequate supports are available for those who can no longer do so by:

  • Completing a review of existing programs in order to project over a 20-year period, policy and financial needs;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for enhanced home and community care services;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for expanded palliative care services;
  • Developing financing options for long-term care facilities; and
  • Proposing a regulatory framework for long term-care.

The Department completed a Long-Term Care Program (LTC) Review to assess the needs over the next 20 years. This included developing updated capital projections for long-term care and dementia beds and developing financing options for long-term care facilities along with a regulatory framework for long-term care. http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/nwt-long-term-care-program-review.pdf

There are currently 183 LTC beds in the system with an additional 27 becoming available with the opening of the Jimmy Erasmus Seniors Home and the Norman Wells LTC facility.

Funding has been approved by the Legislative Assembly for an additional 72 beds at the Old Stanton facility, 48 beds in Hay River as well as planning for additional beds in Inuvik.

In 2018, the Department plans to continue work on developing LTC financing options and a regulatory framework proposal.

Complete research and analysis to assess feasibility of financing options
Complete development of financing options
 
Proposing a regulatory framework for long-term care.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.2.1: Support elders to live in their own homes for as long as possible and ensure adequate supports are available for those who can no longer do so by:

  • Completing a review of existing programs in order to project over a 20-year period, policy and financial needs;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for enhanced home and community care services;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for expanded palliative care services;
  • Developing financing options for long-term care facilities; and
  • Proposing a regulatory framework for long term-care.

The Department completed a Long-Term Care Program (LTC) Review to assess the needs over the next 20 years. This included developing updated capital projections for long-term care and dementia beds and developing financing options for long-term care facilities along with a regulatory framework for long-term care. http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/nwt-long-term-care-program-review.pdf

There are currently 183 LTC beds in the system with an additional 27 becoming available with the opening of the Jimmy Erasmus Seniors Home and the Norman Wells LTC facility.

Funding has been approved by the Legislative Assembly for an additional 72 beds at the Old Stanton facility, 48 beds in Hay River as well as planning for additional beds in Inuvik.

In 2018, the Department plans to continue work on developing LTC financing options and a regulatory framework proposal.

.

Develop discussion paper and engage with public
Develop legislative proposal to establish regulatory framework for long-term care for Cabinet approval
 
Developing and implementing an action plan for enhanced home and community care services
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.2.1: Support elders to live in their own homes for as long as possible and ensure adequate supports are available for those who can no longer do so by:

  • Completing a review of existing programs in order to project over a 20-year period, policy and financial needs;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for enhanced home and community care services;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for expanded palliative care services;
  • Developing financing options for long-term care facilities; and
  • Proposing a regulatory framework for long term-care.

The Department completed a Long-Term Care Program (LTC) Review to assess the needs over the next 20 years. This included developing updated capital projections for long-term care and dementia beds and developing financing options for long-term care facilities along with a regulatory framework for long-term care. http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/nwt-long-term-care-program-review.pdf

There are currently 183 LTC beds in the system with an additional 27 becoming available with the opening of the Jimmy Erasmus Seniors Home and the Norman Wells LTC facility.

Funding has been approved by the Legislative Assembly for an additional 72 beds at the Old Stanton facility, 48 beds in Hay River as well as planning for additional beds in Inuvik.

In 2018, the Department plans to continue work on developing LTC financing options and a regulatory framework proposal.

Finalize the Continuing Care action plan
Develop an implementation plan
Implement 2017/18 actions outlined in Implementation Plan
 
Developing and implementing an action plan for expanded palliative care services.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.2.1: Support elders to live in their own homes for as long as possible and ensure adequate supports are available for those who can no longer do so by:

  • Completing a review of existing programs in order to project over a 20-year period, policy and financial needs;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for enhanced home and community care services;
  • Developing and implementing an action plan for expanded palliative care services;
  • Developing financing options for long-term care facilities; and
  • Proposing a regulatory framework for long term-care.

The Department completed a Long-Term Care Program (LTC) Review to assess the needs over the next 20 years. This included developing updated capital projections for long-term care and dementia beds and developing financing options for long-term care facilities along with a regulatory framework for long-term care. http://www.hss.gov.nt.ca/sites/default/files/nwt-long-term-care-program-review.pdf

There are currently 183 LTC beds in the system with an additional 27 becoming available with the opening of the Jimmy Erasmus Seniors Home and the Norman Wells LTC facility.

Funding has been approved by the Legislative Assembly for an additional 72 beds at the Old Stanton facility, 48 beds in Hay River as well as planning for additional beds in Inuvik.

In 2018, the Department plans to continue work on developing LTC financing options and a regulatory framework proposal.

Finalize the Continuing Care action plan
Develop an implementation plan
Implement 2017/18 actions outlined in Implementation Plan
 
Building more Seniors’ Supported Independent Living units.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.2.1 – We will support elders to live in their own homes for as long as possible and ensure adequate supports are available for those who can no longer do so, by:
Building more Seniors’ Supported Independent Living units.

The NWTHC, working in conjunction with the Department of Health and Social Services (HSS), is constructing five (5) buildings containing nine (9) units, or (9-plexes), to support the priority of promoting community wellness and safety in the Mandate of the 18th Legislative Assembly, and also the commitment made by the NWTHC to support older adults/elders to be able to remain in their own communities for as long as possible.

The Joe Greenland Centre, (a 9-plex in Aklavik), was completed in August 2015. The 9-plex in Fort Liard was completed in June 2016, and the 9-plex in Whatı̀ was completed in August 2017.

The 9-plex in Fort McPherson is scheduled for completion by September 28, 2018.

The 9-plex in Fort Good Hope has experienced challenges that are delaying its completion. The NWTHC is working closely with the Contractor to develop the most economic and timely approach to completion. The expected completion date is December 31, 2018.

Complete complex in Fort Liard
Complete complex in Whati
Develop a planning study that explores the need for seniors housing
Complete complexes in Fort McPherson and Fort Good Hope
 
Marketing preventative maintenance, renovation and mobility upgrades.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.2.1 – We will support elders to live in their own homes for as long as possible and ensure adequate supports are available for those who can no longer do so, by:
Marketing preventative maintenance, renovation and mobility upgrades.

The NWTHC actively promotes its programs through Local Housing Organizations and the NWTHC Senior’s Society.

Communications and marketing materials have been developed that are tailored toward seniors and distributed through LHO’s and NWTHC District offices.

The NWTHC implemented a targeted communications plan for seniors was initiated in September 2016. Seniors targeted communications has continued on a regular and perennial basis.

Launch communications campaign to increase program uptake
Evaluate marketing and promotions campaign
Promote new seniors programs - aging in place repairs
Fostering healthy families by focusing on wellness, prevention, and improved nutrition.
4.3.1
We will continue implementing the Building Stronger Families action plan to transform child and family services by:
 
Auditing to ensure compliance with the Child and Family Services Act.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.1: Continue implementing the Building Stronger Families action plan to transform child and family services by:

•Auditing to ensure compliance with the Child and Family Services Act;

•Implementing a standardized approach to assessing children’s immediate safety needs and future risk of harm;

•Developing caseload and workload measures for child protection in order to monitor and track the resources that are required to ensure compliance with the Child and Family Services Act; and

•Reviewing the standards and delivery methods of the Healthy Family Program to determine whether there are more effective ways to reach families-at-risk.

The Office of the Auditor General of Canada conducted a review of Child and Family Services in relation to child protection services from 2012 to 2013. A report of the recommendations resulting from this review along with recommendations from the Standing Committee on Government Operations was tabled in the 17th Legislative Assembly. In response, the Department developed and released the Building Stronger Families: An Action Plan to Transform Child and Family Services in the NWT.

The Healthy Family Program is currently offered in sixteen communities in the NWT. The program focuses on early intervention and development for at risk families with children under the age of 5 by supporting home visits and various group activities. In 2017 the Department coordinated focus group meetings as well as a territorial workshop to inform the reframing of the Healthy Family Program

Implementing Structured Decision Making (SDM) responds to the Office of the Auditor General of Canada’s recommendation that the child and family services system needs an improved way of assessing both short and long-term risks to the safety and wellbeing of children. SDM is a state-of-the-art, internationally-recognized approach to child protection work developed by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, Children’s Research Centre. SDM is a suite of six assessment tools that support child protection work at key decision points in the life of a case, will help make child protection work more family-friendly and will emphasize a focus on family strengths and needs. Four of these tools have been adapted for use in the NWT.

MatrixNT is an electronic Child and Family Services Information System that allows workers to better manage cases and workloads. User training was completed in the fall of 2017 with the system going live shortly after.

Implement Annual Audit Process
 
Implementing a standardized approach to assessing children’s immediate safety needs and future risk of harm.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.1: Continue implementing the Building Stronger Families action plan to transform child and family services by:

•Auditing to ensure compliance with the Child and Family Services Act;

•Implementing a standardized approach to assessing children’s immediate safety needs and future risk of harm;

•Developing caseload and workload measures for child protection in order to monitor and track the resources that are required to ensure compliance with the Child and Family Services Act; and

•Reviewing the standards and delivery methods of the Healthy Family Program to determine whether there are more effective ways to reach families-at-risk.

The Office of the Auditor General of Canada conducted a review of Child and Family Services in relation to child protection services from 2012 to 2013. A report of the recommendations resulting from this review along with recommendations from the Standing Committee on Government Operations was tabled in the 17th Legislative Assembly. In response, the Department developed and released the Building Stronger Families: An Action Plan to Transform Child and Family Services in the NWT.

The Healthy Family Program is currently offered in sixteen communities in the NWT. The program focuses on early intervention and development for at risk families with children under the age of 5 by supporting home visits and various group activities. In 2017 the Department coordinated focus group meetings as well as a territorial workshop to inform the reframing of the Healthy Family Program

Implementing Structured Decision Making (SDM) responds to the Office of the Auditor General of Canada’s recommendation that the child and family services system needs an improved way of assessing both short and long-term risks to the safety and wellbeing of children. SDM is a state-of-the-art, internationally-recognized approach to child protection work developed by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, Children’s Research Centre. SDM is a suite of six assessment tools that support child protection work at key decision points in the life of a case, will help make child protection work more family-friendly and will emphasize a focus on family strengths and needs. Four of these tools have been adapted for use in the NWT.

MatrixNT is an electronic Child and Family Services Information System that allows workers to better manage cases and workloads. User training was completed in the fall of 2017 with the system going live shortly after.

Implement Safety and Risk of Future Harm assessments
 
Developing caseload and workload measures for child protection in order to monitor and track the resources that are required to ensure compliance with the Child and Family Services Act.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.1: Continue implementing the Building Stronger Families action plan to transform child and family services by:

•Auditing to ensure compliance with the Child and Family Services Act;

•Implementing a standardized approach to assessing children’s immediate safety needs and future risk of harm;

•Developing caseload and workload measures for child protection in order to monitor and track the resources that are required to ensure compliance with the Child and Family Services Act; and

•Reviewing the standards and delivery methods of the Healthy Family Program to determine whether there are more effective ways to reach families-at-risk.

The Office of the Auditor General of Canada conducted a review of Child and Family Services in relation to child protection services from 2012 to 2013. A report of the recommendations resulting from this review along with recommendations from the Standing Committee on Government Operations was tabled in the 17th Legislative Assembly. In response, the Department developed and released the Building Stronger Families: An Action Plan to Transform Child and Family Services in the NWT.

The Healthy Family Program is currently offered in sixteen communities in the NWT. The program focuses on early intervention and development for at risk families with children under the age of 5 by supporting home visits and various group activities. In 2017 the Department coordinated focus group meetings as well as a territorial workshop to inform the reframing of the Healthy Family Program

Implementing Structured Decision Making (SDM) responds to the Office of the Auditor General of Canada’s recommendation that the child and family services system needs an improved way of assessing both short and long-term risks to the safety and wellbeing of children. SDM is a state-of-the-art, internationally-recognized approach to child protection work developed by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, Children’s Research Centre. SDM is a suite of six assessment tools that support child protection work at key decision points in the life of a case, will help make child protection work more family-friendly and will emphasize a focus on family strengths and needs. Four of these tools have been adapted for use in the NWT.

MatrixNT is an electronic Child and Family Services Information System that allows workers to better manage cases and workloads. User training was completed in the fall of 2017 with the system going live shortly after.

Develop measures to track caseload and workload
 
Reviewing the standards and delivery methods of the Healthy Family Program to determine whether there are more effective ways to reach families-at-risk.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.1: Continue implementing the Building Stronger Families action plan to transform child and family services by:

•Auditing to ensure compliance with the Child and Family Services Act;

•Implementing a standardized approach to assessing children’s immediate safety needs and future risk of harm;

•Developing caseload and workload measures for child protection in order to monitor and track the resources that are required to ensure compliance with the Child and Family Services Act; and

•Reviewing the standards and delivery methods of the Healthy Family Program to determine whether there are more effective ways to reach families-at-risk.

The Office of the Auditor General of Canada conducted a review of Child and Family Services in relation to child protection services from 2012 to 2013. A report of the recommendations resulting from this review along with recommendations from the Standing Committee on Government Operations was tabled in the 17th Legislative Assembly. In response, the Department developed and released the Building Stronger Families: An Action Plan to Transform Child and Family Services in the NWT.

The Healthy Family Program is currently offered in sixteen communities in the NWT. The program focuses on early intervention and development for at risk families with children under the age of 5 by supporting home visits and various group activities. In 2017 the Department coordinated focus group meetings as well as a territorial workshop to inform the reframing of the Healthy Family Program

Implementing Structured Decision Making (SDM) responds to the Office of the Auditor General of Canada’s recommendation that the child and family services system needs an improved way of assessing both short and long-term risks to the safety and wellbeing of children. SDM is a state-of-the-art, internationally-recognized approach to child protection work developed by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, Children’s Research Centre. SDM is a suite of six assessment tools that support child protection work at key decision points in the life of a case, will help make child protection work more family-friendly and will emphasize a focus on family strengths and needs. Four of these tools have been adapted for use in the NWT.

MatrixNT is an electronic Child and Family Services Information System that allows workers to better manage cases and workloads. User training was completed in the fall of 2017 with the system going live shortly after.

Review Healthy Family Program Standards
Host Workshop for coordinators on standards and delivery methods
Implement revisions to Healthy Family Program
 
4.3.2
We will explore options for expanding beyond Yellowknife, the Mediation and Parenting after Separation and Divorce Program.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.2 – We will explore options for expanding beyond Yellowknife, the Mediation and Parenting after Separation and Divorce Program.

The Mediation and Parenting After Separation programs both support families experiencing separation or divorce.

Mediation – Family Law Mediation is an alternative to the traditional court system for resolving disputes related to child custody, access and support. The program was established in 2009, and allows parties to exercise a greater degree of control over their situation by working together to reach their own agreement. The program uses a roster of mediators to offer family law mediation services in person, by teleconference and by services such as WebEx and Skype. The program is available throughout the territory to parents. It is free for a maximum of nine hours, plus one hour of private pre-mediation for each parent.

The Mediation program is currently available across the NWT. Residents living in remote communities can access mediation services by phone and in some circumstances, over the internet. The Parenting after Separation program is offered in Yellowknife and in Behchokǫ̀. Since November 7, 2015, the workshop has been offered via webinar, and is available to residents across the NWT. The Department of Justice will continue to examine ways to promote and make the workshop more accessible to residents.

Parenting After Separation –Parenting After Separation is a free half-day workshop that focuses on building greater awareness in parents of the challenges they can expect, and the healthy responses they can provide when making parenting decisions after a separation or divorce. Effective April 1, 2010 the Supreme Court of the Northwest Territories issued a practice direction requiring every Yellowknife resident commencing a family law proceeding (with a number of exceptions) to attend a Parenting After Separation workshop prior to filing the document commencing that proceeding.

The Parenting after Separation program is offered in Yellowknife and in Behchokǫ̀. Since November 7, 2015, the workshop has been offered via webinar, and is available to residents across the NWT. The Department of Justice will continue to examine ways to promote and make the workshop more accessible to residents.

Steps to expand both programs beyond Yellowknife included making the mediation program available in all communities (Milestone 1), offering the Parenting After Separation Program via webinar (Milestone 2), and launch a revised Parenting After Separation workshop manual (Milestone 3).

Related Mandate Commitments:

  • Commitment 4.4.3 - We will seek to improve access to justice in the NWT, by expanding community legal outreach programs, making family law duty counsel services available to assist self-represented family members on first appearance in family court, and expanding public legal information on programs and services so that people know what help is out there and how to access it.

Offer mediation program in all communities
Offer Parenting After Separation Program webinar
Launch revised Parenting After Separation workshop manual
4.3.3
We will continue to support at-risk children and families through preventative and collaborative approaches, including:
 
Introducing a risk assessment tool to enable child protection workers to support families more effectively.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.3: Continue to support at-risk children and families through preventative and collaborative approach, including:

•Introducing a risk assessment tool to enable child protection workers to support families more effectively

•Ensuring services for children in care focus not just on safety, but also on stability and child development

•Improving the coordination, delivery and effectiveness of family services through an integrated care model

•Improving system supports for Aboriginal children and families including improving the cultural competence of service providers.

 

Implementing Structured Decision Making (SDM) responds to the Office of the Auditor General of Canada’s recommendation that the child and family services system needs an improved way of assessing both short and long-term risks to the safety and wellbeing of children. SDM is a state-of-the art, internationally-recognized approach to child protection work, which is developed by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, Children’s Research Centre. SDM is a suite of six assessment tools that support child protection work at key decision points in the life of a case, will help make child protection work more family-friendly and will emphasize a focus on family strengths and needs. Four of these tools have been adapted for use in the NWT.

One of the Goals under Building Stronger Families is that every child who is taken into permanent care and custody should have a permanency plan developed at the earliest opportunity. Permanency planning is based on the principle that every child has the right to a permanent family, with the child’s family of origin as the first option. Permanency planning lays out the steps, the services and the outcomes required to re-unit the child with his or her family. If all efforts to re-unite the child with the family are unsuccessful, permanency planning may include placement with extended family, kinship care, adoption or other arrangements.

The Department intends to make improvements to coordination and delivery of family services by integrating training opportunities for service providers working in child and family services and mental health and addictions. To improve support systems for indigenous youth and families in the NWT, the Department has incorporated cultural competency into staff training through the use of a traditional knowledge holder.

Implement Safety and Risk of Future Harm assessments
 
Ensuring services for children in care focus not just on safety, but also on stability and child development.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.3: Continue to support at-risk children and families through preventative and collaborative approach, including:

•Introducing a risk assessment tool to enable child protection workers to support families more effectively

•Ensuring services for children in care focus not just on safety, but also on stability and child development

•Improving the coordination, delivery and effectiveness of family services through an integrated care model

•Improving system supports for Aboriginal children and families including improving the cultural competence of service providers.

 

Implementing Structured Decision Making (SDM) responds to the Office of the Auditor General of Canada’s recommendation that the child and family services system needs an improved way of assessing both short and long-term risks to the safety and wellbeing of children. SDM is a state-of-the art, internationally-recognized approach to child protection work, which is developed by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, Children’s Research Centre. SDM is a suite of six assessment tools that support child protection work at key decision points in the life of a case, will help make child protection work more family-friendly and will emphasize a focus on family strengths and needs. Four of these tools have been adapted for use in the NWT.

One of the Goals under Building Stronger Families is that every child who is taken into permanent care and custody should have a permanency plan developed at the earliest opportunity. Permanency planning is based on the principle that every child has the right to a permanent family, with the child’s family of origin as the first option. Permanency planning lays out the steps, the services and the outcomes required to re-unit the child with his or her family. If all efforts to re-unite the child with the family are unsuccessful, permanency planning may include placement with extended family, kinship care, adoption or other arrangements.

The Department intends to make improvements to coordination and delivery of family services by integrating training opportunities for service providers working in child and family services and mental health and addictions. To improve support systems for indigenous youth and families in the NWT, the Department has incorporated cultural competency into staff training through the use of a traditional knowledge holder.

Revise and enhance permanency planning process
Develop a monitoring approach to ensrue standards are implemented
 
Improving the coordination, delivery and effectiveness of family services through an integrated care model. (ongoing)
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.3: Continue to support at-risk children and families through preventative and collaborative approach, including:

•Introducing a risk assessment tool to enable child protection workers to support families more effectively

•Ensuring services for children in care focus not just on safety, but also on stability and child development

•Improving the coordination, delivery and effectiveness of family services through an integrated care model

•Improving system supports for Aboriginal children and families including improving the cultural competence of service providers.

 

Implementing Structured Decision Making (SDM) responds to the Office of the Auditor General of Canada’s recommendation that the child and family services system needs an improved way of assessing both short and long-term risks to the safety and wellbeing of children. SDM is a state-of-the art, internationally-recognized approach to child protection work, which is developed by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, Children’s Research Centre. SDM is a suite of six assessment tools that support child protection work at key decision points in the life of a case, will help make child protection work more family-friendly and will emphasize a focus on family strengths and needs. Four of these tools have been adapted for use in the NWT.

One of the Goals under Building Stronger Families is that every child who is taken into permanent care and custody should have a permanency plan developed at the earliest opportunity.  Permanency planning is based on the principle that every child has the right to a permanent family, with the child’s family of origin as the first option.  Permanency planning lays out the steps, the services and the outcomes required to re-unit the child with his or her family. If all efforts to re-unite the child with the family are unsuccessful, permanency planning may include placement with extended family, kinship care, adoption or other arrangements.

The Department intends to make improvements to coordination and delivery of family services by integrating training opportunities for service providers working in child and family services and mental health and addictions. To improve support systems for indigenous youth and families in the NWT, the Department has incorporated cultural competency into staff training through the use of a traditional knowledge holder.

Introduce Family Strengths and Needs Assessment tools
 
Improving system supports for Aboriginal children and families including improving the cultural competence of service providers.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.3: Continue to support at-risk children and families through preventative and collaborative approach, including:

•Introducing a risk assessment tool to enable child protection workers to support families more effectively

•Ensuring services for children in care focus not just on safety, but also on stability and child development

•Improving the coordination, delivery and effectiveness of family services through an integrated care model

•Improving system supports for Aboriginal children and families including improving the cultural competence of service providers.

 

Implementing Structured Decision Making (SDM) responds to the Office of the Auditor General of Canada’s recommendation that the child and family services system needs an improved way of assessing both short and long-term risks to the safety and wellbeing of children. SDM is a state-of-the art, internationally-recognized approach to child protection work, which is developed by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, Children’s Research Centre. SDM is a suite of six assessment tools that support child protection work at key decision points in the life of a case, will help make child protection work more family-friendly and will emphasize a focus on family strengths and needs. Four of these tools have been adapted for use in the NWT.

One of the Goals under Building Stronger Families is that every child who is taken into permanent care and custody should have a permanency plan developed at the earliest opportunity. Permanency planning is based on the principle that every child has the right to a permanent family, with the child’s family of origin as the first option. Permanency planning lays out the steps, the services and the outcomes required to re-unit the child with his or her family. If all efforts to re-unite the child with the family are unsuccessful, permanency planning may include placement with extended family, kinship care, adoption or other arrangements.

The Department intends to make improvements to coordination and delivery of family services by integrating training opportunities for service providers working in child and family services and mental health and addictions. To improve support systems for indigenous youth and families in the NWT, the Department has incorporated cultural competency into staff training through the use of a traditional knowledge holder.

Enhance cultural competency training through the use of a traditional knowledge holder
4.3.4
We will continue implementing Right from the Start to improve early childhood development, by:
 
Improving oral health and developmental outcomes for children aged 0-5.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.4: We will continue implementing Right from the Start to improve early childhood development by:

  • Improving oral health and developmental outcomes for children aged 0-5
  • Developing options to enhance access to birthing services and pre and post natal care, including development of a territorial Midwifery model
  • Supporting community wellness initiatives with early childhood development funding and subject matter expertise

 

The Department of Health and Social Services and the Department of Education, Culture and Employment continue to collaborate to complete the actions outlined in the Right from the Start 10 year strategic framework and the ECD Action Plan for 2017 – 20 with the goal of improving early childhood development across the NWT.

With funding from Health Canada, the Department is developing the NWT Oral Health Initiative with the goal of improving oral health services in the NWT. This initiative is focused on creating an integrated oral health program for all children within the NWT, the prevention and promotion activities that emphasize oral health as a part of overall health and the reduction of costs to the health system associated with acute dental treatments through increased prevention activities.

Midwifery Services continue to be offered in Hay River and Fort Smith. The GNWT is committed to the development of a territory-wide midwifery program that supports mothers, babies and families in our communities.

Pilot oral health promotion and prevention programming
Assess feasibility of expanding oral health promotion and prevention programming
Develop and implement a new Oral Health Promotion and Prevention Program
 
Developing options to enhance access to birthing services and pre- and post-natal care, including development of a territorial midwifery model.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.4: We will continue implementing Right from the Start to improve early childhood development by:

  • Improving oral health and developmental outcomes for children aged 0-5
  • Developing options to enhance access to birthing services and pre and post natal care, including development of a territorial Midwifery model
  • Supporting community wellness initiatives with early childhood development funding and subject matter expertise

 

The Department of Health and Social Services and the Department of Education, Culture and Employment continue to collaborate to complete the actions outlined in the Right from the Start 10 year strategic framework and the ECD Action Plan for 2017 – 20 with the goal of improving early childhood development across the NWT.

With funding from Health Canada, the Department is developing the NWT Oral Health Initiative with the goal of improving oral health services in the NWT. This initiative is focused on creating an integrated oral health program for all children within the NWT, the prevention and promotion activities that emphasize oral health as a part of overall health and the reduction of costs to the health system associated with acute dental treatments through increased prevention activities.

Midwifery Services continue to be offered in Hay River and Fort Smith. The GNWT is committed to the development of a territory-wide midwifery program that supports mothers, babies and families in our communities.

Complete consultation with partners and stakeholders
Develop proposal for implementation of territorial midwifery program
Assess feasibility of implementing territorial program
 
Supporting community wellness initiatives with early childhood development funding and subject matter expertise.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.4: We will continue implementing Right from the Start to improve early childhood development by:

  • Improving oral health and developmental outcomes for children aged 0-5
  • Developing options to enhance access to birthing services and pre and post natal care, including development of a territorial Midwifery model
  • Supporting community wellness initiatives with early childhood development funding and subject matter expertise

 

The Department of Health and Social Services and the Department of Education, Culture and Employment continue to collaborate to complete the actions outlined in the Right from the Start 10 year strategic framework and the ECD Action Plan for 2017 – 20 with the goal of improving early childhood development across the NWT.

With funding from Health Canada, the Department is developing the NWT Oral Health Initiative with the goal of improving oral health services in the NWT. This initiative is focused on creating an integrated oral health program for all children within the NWT, the prevention and promotion activities that emphasize oral health as a part of overall health and the reduction of costs to the health system associated with acute dental treatments through increased prevention activities.

Midwifery Services continue to be offered in Hay River and Fort Smith. The GNWT is committed to the development of a territory-wide midwifery program that supports mothers, babies and families in our communities.

Host territorial and regional Early Childhood Development Forums
4.3.5
We will reduce the burden of chronic disease by promoting healthy lifestyles and improving screening and management, with specific focus on:
 
Promoting healthy eating in NWT communities through a variety of programs including Healthy Family Collective Kitchens and Drop the Pop.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.5: Reduce the burden of chronic disease by promoting healthy lifestyles and improving screening and management, with specific focus on:

  • Promoting healthy eating in NWT communities through a variety of programs including Healthy Family Collective Kitchens and Drop the Pop
  • Supporting Healthy Living Fairs in communities
  • Increasing awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids
  • Standardizing access to cancer screening across the NWT
  • Developing improved supports for patients and families battling cancer
  • Giving health care providers tools and training to support patients and families in the management of chronic disease such as diabetes
  • Developing and proposing updated tobacco control legislation

The Department of Health and Social Services continues to move forward on initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of chronic diseases that affect NWT residents’ quality of life and increase health care costs. The key areas of focus around chronic disease are surveillance, prevention, screening and clinical management.

Work to complete a Chronic Disease Prevention & Management Framework is ongoing in the Department. This framework will aid in the coordination of various activities already underway while also aiding in identifying priorities for further action and investments.

Prevention of chronic disease through education and encouragement continues to be a key activity of the Department. Programs such as Healthy Family Collective Kitchens Drop the Pop and Healthy Living Fairs promote healthy lifestyle choices. Furthermore, the Department will increase awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids taking a strong community approach.

Addressing the burden of cancer, the Department released its first NWT Cancer Strategy in October 2015. The Department also launched the Let’s Talk About Cancer website which includes information on screening and early detection as well as resources for cancer patients and families.

  1. immunochemical tests (FIT) are simple, take-home tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer. These tests are made available at local health centres for patients to take home. Healthcare workers have received training on increasing public awareness of colorectal cancer and the importance of FIT screening. Inflatable colon used to illustrate the stages of colorectal cancer and the importance of early detection, as well as FIT kit demos were also provided to healthcare workers.
Promote healthy eating programs in NWT communities (ongoing
 
Hosting Healthy Living Fairs in communities.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.5: Reduce the burden of chronic disease by promoting healthy lifestyles and improving screening and management, with specific focus on:

  • Promoting healthy eating in NWT communities through a variety of programs including Healthy Family Collective Kitchens and Drop the Pop
  • Supporting Healthy Living Fairs in communities
  • Increasing awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids
  • Standardizing access to cancer screening across the NWT
  • Developing improved supports for patients and families battling cancer
  • Giving health care providers tools and training to support patients and families in the management of chronic disease such as diabetes
  • Developing and proposing updated tobacco control legislation

The Department of Health and Social Services continues to move forward on initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of chronic diseases that affect NWT residents’ quality of life and increase health care costs. The key areas of focus around chronic disease are surveillance, prevention, screening and clinical management.

Work to complete a Chronic Disease Prevention & Management Framework is ongoing in the Department. This framework will aid in the coordination of various activities already underway while also aiding in identifying priorities for further action and investments.

Prevention of chronic disease through education and encouragement continues to be a key activity of the Department. Programs such as Healthy Family Collective Kitchens Drop the Pop and Healthy Living Fairs promote healthy lifestyle choices. Furthermore, the Department will increase awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids taking a strong community approach.

Addressing the burden of cancer, the Department released its first NWT Cancer Strategy in October 2015. The Department also launched the Let’s Talk About Cancer website which includes information on screening and early detection as well as resources for cancer patients and families.

  1. immunochemical tests (FIT) are simple, take-home tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer. These tests are made available at local health centres for patients to take home. Healthcare workers have received training on increasing public awareness of colorectal cancer and the importance of FIT screening. Inflatable colon used to illustrate the stages of colorectal cancer and the importance of early detection, as well as FIT kit demos were also provided to healthcare workers.
Support annual Healthy Living fairs in 18 communities (ongoing
 
Increasing awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.5: Reduce the burden of chronic disease by promoting healthy lifestyles and improving screening and management, with specific focus on:

  • Promoting healthy eating in NWT communities through a variety of programs including Healthy Family Collective Kitchens and Drop the Pop
  • Supporting Healthy Living Fairs in communities
  • Increasing awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids
  • Standardizing access to cancer screening across the NWT
  • Developing improved supports for patients and families battling cancer
  • Giving health care providers tools and training to support patients and families in the management of chronic disease such as diabetes
  • Developing and proposing updated tobacco control legislation

The Department of Health and Social Services continues to move forward on initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of chronic diseases that affect NWT residents’ quality of life and increase health care costs. The key areas of focus around chronic disease are surveillance, prevention, screening and clinical management.

Work to complete a Chronic Disease Prevention & Management Framework is ongoing in the Department. This framework will aid in the coordination of various activities already underway while also aiding in identifying priorities for further action and investments.

Prevention of chronic disease through education and encouragement continues to be a key activity of the Department. Programs such as Healthy Family Collective Kitchens Drop the Pop and Healthy Living Fairs promote healthy lifestyle choices. Furthermore, the Department will increase awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids taking a strong community approach.

Addressing the burden of cancer, the Department released its first NWT Cancer Strategy in October 2015. The Department also launched the Let’s Talk About Cancer website which includes information on screening and early detection as well as resources for cancer patients and families.

  1. immunochemical tests (FIT) are simple, take-home tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer. These tests are made available at local health centres for patients to take home. Healthcare workers have received training on increasing public awareness of colorectal cancer and the importance of FIT screening. Inflatable colon used to illustrate the stages of colorectal cancer and the importance of early detection, as well as FIT kit demos were also provided to healthcare workers.
Engage with community delivery partners
Work with community partners to integrate tobacco prevention and cessation into community wellness plans
Work with community partners to incorporate Traditional Knowledge into tobacco cessation efforts
Establish feedback mechanism from target populations
Enhance smoking cessation services in primary care
 
Standardizing access to cancer screening across the NWT.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.5: Reduce the burden of chronic disease by promoting healthy lifestyles and improving screening and management, with specific focus on:

  • Promoting healthy eating in NWT communities through a variety of programs including Healthy Family Collective Kitchens and Drop the Pop
  • Supporting Healthy Living Fairs in communities
  • Increasing awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids
  • Standardizing access to cancer screening across the NWT
  • Developing improved supports for patients and families battling cancer
  • Giving health care providers tools and training to support patients and families in the management of chronic disease such as diabetes
  • Developing and proposing updated tobacco control legislation

The Department of Health and Social Services continues to move forward on initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of chronic diseases that affect NWT residents’ quality of life and increase health care costs. The key areas of focus around chronic disease are surveillance, prevention, screening and clinical management.

Work to complete a Chronic Disease Prevention & Management Framework is ongoing in the Department. This framework will aid in the coordination of various activities already underway while also aiding in identifying priorities for further action and investments.

Prevention of chronic disease through education and encouragement continues to be a key activity of the Department. Programs such as Healthy Family Collective Kitchens Drop the Pop and Healthy Living Fairs promote healthy lifestyle choices. Furthermore, the Department will increase awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids taking a strong community approach.

Addressing the burden of cancer, the Department released its first NWT Cancer Strategy in October 2015. The Department also launched the Let’s Talk About Cancer website which includes information on screening and early detection as well as resources for cancer patients and families.

  1. immunochemical tests (FIT) are simple, take-home tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer. These tests are made available at local health centres for patients to take home. Healthcare workers have received training on increasing public awareness of colorectal cancer and the importance of FIT screening. Inflatable colon used to illustrate the stages of colorectal cancer and the importance of early detection, as well as FIT kit demos were also provided to healthcare workers.
Develop Proposal for integrated territorial colorectal cancer screening
Provide education for health care professionals and community health workers
Implement systems approach to improving cancer screening uptake
 
Developing improved supports for patients and families battling cancer.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.5: Reduce the burden of chronic disease by promoting healthy lifestyles and improving screening and management, with specific focus on:

  • Promoting healthy eating in NWT communities through a variety of programs including Healthy Family Collective Kitchens and Drop the Pop
  • Supporting Healthy Living Fairs in communities
  • Increasing awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids
  • Standardizing access to cancer screening across the NWT
  • Developing improved supports for patients and families battling cancer
  • Giving health care providers tools and training to support patients and families in the management of chronic disease such as diabetes
  • Developing and proposing updated tobacco control legislation

The Department of Health and Social Services continues to move forward on initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of chronic diseases that affect NWT residents’ quality of life and increase health care costs. The key areas of focus around chronic disease are surveillance, prevention, screening and clinical management.

Work to complete a Chronic Disease Prevention & Management Framework is ongoing in the Department. This framework will aid in the coordination of various activities already underway while also aiding in identifying priorities for further action and investments.

Prevention of chronic disease through education and encouragement continues to be a key activity of the Department. Programs such as Healthy Family Collective Kitchens Drop the Pop and Healthy Living Fairs promote healthy lifestyle choices. Furthermore, the Department will increase awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids taking a strong community approach.

Addressing the burden of cancer, the Department released its first NWT Cancer Strategy in October 2015. The Department also launched the Let’s Talk About Cancer website which includes information on screening and early detection as well as resources for cancer patients and families.

  1. immunochemical tests (FIT) are simple, take-home tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer. These tests are made available at local health centres for patients to take home. Healthcare workers have received training on increasing public awareness of colorectal cancer and the importance of FIT screening. Inflatable colon used to illustrate the stages of colorectal cancer and the importance of early detection, as well as FIT kit demos were also provided to healthcare workers.
Develop cancer journey navigation resource binder
Develop emotional support directory
 
Giving health care providers tools and training to support patients and families in the management of chronic disease such as diabetes.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.5: Reduce the burden of chronic disease by promoting healthy lifestyles and improving screening and management, with specific focus on:

  • Promoting healthy eating in NWT communities through a variety of programs including Healthy Family Collective Kitchens and Drop the Pop
  • Supporting Healthy Living Fairs in communities
  • Increasing awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids
  • Standardizing access to cancer screening across the NWT
  • Developing improved supports for patients and families battling cancer
  • Giving health care providers tools and training to support patients and families in the management of chronic disease such as diabetes
  • Developing and proposing updated tobacco control legislation

The Department of Health and Social Services continues to move forward on initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of chronic diseases that affect NWT residents’ quality of life and increase health care costs. The key areas of focus around chronic disease are surveillance, prevention, screening and clinical management.

Work to complete a Chronic Disease Prevention & Management Framework is ongoing in the Department. This framework will aid in the coordination of various activities already underway while also aiding in identifying priorities for further action and investments.

Prevention of chronic disease through education and encouragement continues to be a key activity of the Department. Programs such as Healthy Family Collective Kitchens Drop the Pop and Healthy Living Fairs promote healthy lifestyle choices. Furthermore, the Department will increase awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids taking a strong community approach.

Addressing the burden of cancer, the Department released its first NWT Cancer Strategy in October 2015. The Department also launched the Let’s Talk About Cancer website which includes information on screening and early detection as well as resources for cancer patients and families.

  1. immunochemical tests (FIT) are simple, take-home tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer. These tests are made available at local health centres for patients to take home. Healthcare workers have received training on increasing public awareness of colorectal cancer and the importance of FIT screening. Inflatable colon used to illustrate the stages of colorectal cancer and the importance of early detection, as well as FIT kit demos were also provided to healthcare workers.
Diabetes registry established
Develop a Chronic Disease Management Framework
Develop a change management and implementation plan for chronic disease management in the NWT
 
Developing and proposing updated tobacco control legislation.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.5: Reduce the burden of chronic disease by promoting healthy lifestyles and improving screening and management, with specific focus on:

  • Promoting healthy eating in NWT communities through a variety of programs including Healthy Family Collective Kitchens and Drop the Pop
  • Supporting Healthy Living Fairs in communities
  • Increasing awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids
  • Standardizing access to cancer screening across the NWT
  • Developing improved supports for patients and families battling cancer
  • Giving health care providers tools and training to support patients and families in the management of chronic disease such as diabetes
  • Developing and proposing updated tobacco control legislation

The Department of Health and Social Services continues to move forward on initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of chronic diseases that affect NWT residents’ quality of life and increase health care costs. The key areas of focus around chronic disease are surveillance, prevention, screening and clinical management.

Work to complete a Chronic Disease Prevention & Management Framework is ongoing in the Department. This framework will aid in the coordination of various activities already underway while also aiding in identifying priorities for further action and investments.

Prevention of chronic disease through education and encouragement continues to be a key activity of the Department. Programs such as Healthy Family Collective Kitchens Drop the Pop and Healthy Living Fairs promote healthy lifestyle choices. Furthermore, the Department will increase awareness and availability of smoking cessation aids taking a strong community approach.

Addressing the burden of cancer, the Department released its first NWT Cancer Strategy in October 2015. The Department also launched the Let’s Talk About Cancer website which includes information on screening and early detection as well as resources for cancer patients and families.

  1. immunochemical tests (FIT) are simple, take-home tests that are used to screen for colorectal cancer. These tests are made available at local health centres for patients to take home. Healthcare workers have received training on increasing public awareness of colorectal cancer and the importance of FIT screening. Inflatable colon used to illustrate the stages of colorectal cancer and the importance of early detection, as well as FIT kit demos were also provided to healthcare workers.
Develop discussion paper and engage with public
Develop legislative proposal to update tobacco control legislation for Cabinet approval
Introduce Bill to update tobacco control legislation
 
Expanding the production and availability of local foods such as fish, country food, and garden produce.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.5

We will reduce the burden of chronic disease by promoting healthy lifestyles and improving screening and management, with specific focus on:

  • Expanding the production and availability of local foods such as fish, country food, and garden produce.

The NWT Economic Opportunities Strategy identified opportunities in agriculture and commercial fisheries revitalization.

NWT Agriculture Strategy

The need for an agriculture strategy to advance economic opportunities in the agriculture sector was first identified in the Economic Opportunities Strategy (EOS).

In developing an Agriculture Strategy, input was received from agricultural experts, producers, businesses, community organizations and residents.

The Strategy is a five year plan that provides a foundation to guide the expansion and growth of the business of food in the NWT.  It is the blueprint with which we intend to grow the economic viability of our agriculture sector.  It outlines the actions we must take, the investments we must make and the legislative tools that need to be put in place.  Over time, the implementation of this Strategy will support and advance commitments that we have made to address the cost-of-living, foster healthy families and enhance capacity-building programs for our youth.

The Agriculture Strategy was released in March 2017 (milestone 1).  The Department of Industry, Tourism, and Investment (ITI) leads the implementation of the Strategy and is working in particular with the Departments of Lands, Environment and Natural Resources, and Health and Social Services to advance the Agriculture Strategy.

Since fall 2016, ITI has led an Interdepartmental Agriculture Working Group to initiate various activities within the Strategy’s Action Plan (milestones 4 and 5).

Strategy for Revitalizing the Great Slave Lake Commercial Fishery

The need to revitalize the NWT’s commercial fishing sector was first identified in the 2013 NWT Economic Opportunities Strategy which recommended that the commercial fishing industry be revitalized to give greater benefit and opportunity to northerners.

The Strategy for Revitalizing the Great Slave Lake Fishery was tabled in the Legislative Assembly on March 2, 2017 (milestone 2).

The Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT) has made a $1.41 million investment to build a new fish processing plant in Hay River.  Building of the plant is expected to begin by the fall of 2018.

The Strategy, as developed, relies on the existence of the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation.  The GNWT is monitoring the situation regarding its future closely and advocating for the best interests of NWT fishers.

Related Mandate Commitments

  • Commitment 1.2.1 - We will expand the agricultural sector by:
    • Implementing the Agriculture Strategy
    • Improving access to agricultural land
    • Updating agricultural funding programs
    • Supporting training for commercial farmers
  • Commitment 1.2.4 - We will finalize and implement the Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy to increase fish production, encourage and mentor new entrants to the Great Slave Lake fishery, negotiate an agreement with the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation to access markets outside of NWT, seek federal funding to build a new fish processing plant in Hay River, and work with the Tu Cho Co-Operative to promote and market fish caught in Great Slave Lake.
  • Commitment 2.5.5 - We will implement programs that support youth in their communities and in their schools to encourage local food production and consumption.
Release Agriculture Strategy and Action Plan
Release Great Slave Lake Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Facilitate the 1st Annual Territorial Agriculture Conference
Work with the NWT Association of Communities to develop municipal bylaw templates compliant with agriculture regulatory framework
Fund extension services for farmer training
 
4.3.6
We will continue integration of the health and social services system, including taking steps to bring the Hay River Health and Social Services Authority into the public service, to improve care for our people, by clarifying timelines, appointing people to Regional Wellness Councils and the NWT Health and Social Services Leadership Council, finalizing roles and responsibilities, and ensuring seamless service delivery for all residents during the transition.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.6: Continue integration of the health and social services system, including taking steps to bring the Hay River Health and Social Services Authority into the public service, to improve care for our people, by clarifying timelines, appointing people to Regional Wellness Councils and the NWT Health and Social Services Leadership Council, finalizing roles and responsibilities, and ensure seamless service delivery for all residents during the transition.

On August 1, 2016 six regional health and social services authorities were amalgamated into a single Territorial Health and Social Services Authority (NTHSSA). The Hay River Health and Social Services Authority (HRHSSA) will remain outside of the NTHSSA until such a time that it can also be consolidated. The Tłįchǫ Community Services Agency (TCSA) will always remain outside of the THSSA, as per the terms of the Tłįchǫ Self-Government Agreement.

Most importantly, the NTHSSA, the HRSSA and the TCSA will become part of one integrated territorial health and social services system functioning together under a one-system-approach. The creation of the NTHSSA and the integrated system will result in enhanced patient/client care, improved safety and more timely and consistent access to care across the entire system. This change will allow the system to work together and be more connected by sharing expertise and resources and improving the overall efficiency of the system.

Moving forward the development of System Transformation Performance will align with development of the NTHSSA 2018-19 operating plan and associated performance measures. The NTHSSA operating plan is expected in the spring of 2018.

Accountability Framework approved
Regional Wellness Council & Territorial Leadership Council appointed
Develop and report on performance measures of System Transformation
Complete implementation evaluation of first 18 months of System Transformation
 
4.3.7
We will continue to work collaboratively to reduce poverty in the NWT by funding community-based partners, convening meetings of stakeholders, finalizing indicators that allow performance to be assessed, collecting information from these indicators into an annual report,and developing additional options for action, and ensuring continuous quality improvement to the administration of the Anti-Poverty Fund based on evaluation results.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.6: Continue integration of the health and social services system, including taking steps to bring the Hay River Health and Social Services Authority into the public service, to improve care for our people, by clarifying timelines, appointing people to Regional Wellness Councils and the NWT Health and Social Services Leadership Council, finalizing roles and responsibilities, and ensure seamless service delivery for all residents during the transition.

 

On August 1, 2016 six regional health and social services authorities were amalgamated into a single Territorial Health and Social Services Authority (NTHSSA). The Hay River Health and Social Services Authority (HRHSSA) will remain outside of the NTHSSA until such a time that it can also be consolidated. The Tłįchǫ Community Services Agency (TCSA) will always remain outside of the THSSA, as per the terms of the Tłįchǫ Self-Government Agreement.

Most importantly, the NTHSSA, the HRSSA and the TCSA will become part of one integrated territorial health and social services system functioning together under a one-system-approach. The creation of the NTHSSA and the integrated system will result in enhanced patient/client care, improved safety and more timely and consistent access to care across the entire system. This change will allow the system to work together and be more connected by sharing expertise and resources and improving the overall efficiency of the system.

Moving forward the development of System Transformation Performance will align with development of the NTHSSA 2018-19 operating plan and associated performance measures. The NTHSSA operating plan is expected in the spring of 2018.

Continue to host Annual Round Tables (ongoing
Continue to implement GNWT commitments in the Territorial Anti-Poverty Action Plan (ongoing
Begin providing annual updates on performance indicators at Anti-Poverty Round Tables and maintain data on performance indicators on the Bureau of Statistics website
Conduct a process evaluation of the Anti-Poverty Fund
Present the evaluation findings at the 2017 Anti-Poverty Round Table
Implement improvements based on evaluation results for the 2018/2019 Anti-Poverty Fund allocation process
 
4.3.8
We will ensure effective supports and programs are in place for persons with disabilities by preparing an accessible inventory of the GNWT supports systems that already exist, and then by responding to previous evaluations of government supports.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.8: Ensure effective supports and programs are in place for persons with disabilities by preparing an accessible inventory of GNWT support systems that already exist, and then by responding to previous evaluations of government supports

The GNWT, along with non-government organizations (NGOs), delivers a range of programs and services to support persons with disabilities and has committed to developing a strategic framework and action plan to guide the delivery of its programs and services.

The GNWT has committed to developing a strategic framework and action plan to guide the delivery of its programs and services to support persons with disabilities. The Disability Program Review and Renewal Project are in progress and will identify gaps in disability programs and services and opportunities for improvement. Through the Review we are engaging other GNWT Departments and NGOs who provide disability related services on behalf of the GNWT. The accessible inventory created through the Review will document what the GNWT has in place today and will assist us in ensuring that we are maximizing the use of existing resources, that these resources are well marketed, as well as to establish priority areas for new initiatives, should additional resources become available over time.

Release inventory of existing support systems
Develop priorities with partners for Strategic Framework and Action Plan
Maximize awareness and access for existing disability programs and services
Release Strategic Framework and Action Plan for Disabilities
 
4.3.9
We will develop and implement a Northwest Territories physical activity strategy for all residents to improve health and fitness.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.9 – We will develop and implement a Northwest Territories physical activity strategy for all residents to improve health and fitness.

Background:

Each year in Canada, more than two-thirds of deaths result from four groups of chronic diseases – cardiovascular, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and respiratory.  These chronic diseases share common preventable risk factors including physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, and tobacco use.

The GNWT health budget is now over $400 million annually (25%).  A significant portion of these expenditures can be attributed to services that are addressing preventable conditions such as physical inactivity.

In 2009, Active Healthy Kids Canada reported that up to 85 percent of NWT youth are not physically active enough.

The Department of Municipal and Community Affairs (MACA) is developing the NWT Physical Activity Strategy (Milestone 1). This strategy will be based on the nationally accepted Active Canada 20/20, an emerging Pan-Canadian Physical Activity Strategy which was presented to Federal – Provincial/ Territorial Ministers in July 2017, the best scientific information available, and solutions made in the NWT that are being effectively implemented across the Territories.  A full consultation process will be included in the development of the strategy.

The NWT Physical Strategy is to be released by the end of 2018 (Milestone 2) and will be

implemented in early 2019 (Milestone 3).

Links to Other Governments Activities:

N/A

For more information about this initiative, please contact the Department of Municipal and Community Affairs.

Develop components of NWT Physical Activity Strategy with partners
Release NWT Physical Activity Strategy
Begin implementation of NWT Physical Activity Strategy
 
4.3.10
We will finalize a strategic plan to enhance existing programming and build new partnership initiatives to support healthy and sustainable traditional lifestyles.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.10 – We will finalize a strategic plan to enhance existing programming and build new partnership initiatives to support healthy and sustainable traditional lifestyles.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) is committed to promoting initiatives that foster and support sustainable livelihoods of NWT residents on-the-land. ENR is moving towards assessing and strengthening existing programming in this area and identification and development of potential new initiatives, particularly with respect to traditional economy and country foods. ENR remains committed to programs such as fur harvesting, community harvesters’ assistance, Take a Kid Trapping, traditional knowledge promotion, and wildlife management.

Traditional Economy Strategy

Working with our ENR Traditional Knowledge Working Group, comprised of Regional and Headquarters staff involved in the day to day operation of the fur program, we will undertake external engagement with stakeholders. The stakeholders are clients who currently utilize and participate in the Genuine Mackenzie Valley Fur Program and other traditional economy programs. The results of that engagement will guide us in the development of our new Traditional Economy Strategy.

Genuine Mackenzie Valley Fur Program

The Genuine Mackenzie Valley Fur Program provides Northwest Territories (NWT) trappers with “one window” access to the international fur auction market for fur harvested in the NWT. In addition, the Program actively markets and promotes fur at international venues through partnerships with other harvesting jurisdictions and the private sector.

ENR is carrying out a strategic planning exercise and looking at ways to improve the programs moving forward.

ENR continues to participate in the NWT On-the-Land Funders Collaborative which supports activities that promote country food security.

Related Mandate Commitments:

  • Commitment 1.2.5 - Through agreements with communities, we will help to establish and/or expand self-sufficient businesses that sell products from renewable resource harvesting.
  • Commitment 3.2.4 - We will develop country food programming to promote opportunities for the consumption of foods such as fish, wildlife, berries, and mushrooms.
Begin public engagement on draft Traditional Economy Strategy
Release Traditional Economy Strategy
 
4.3.11
We will promote volunteerism by ensuring effective programming such as the Volunteer Development Fund, Outstanding Volunteer Awards, NGO Stabilization Fund, and the Community Volunteer Recognition Program.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.11 – We will promote volunteerism by ensuring effective programming such as the Volunteer Development Fund, Outstanding Volunteer Awards, NGO Stabilization Fund, and the Community Volunteer Recognition Program.

Background:

The Department of Municipal and Community Affairs (MACA) continues to deliver various programs designed to support and promote volunteerism in the Northwest Territories by providing ongoing support that volunteer organizations and community governments can access throughout the year. To ensure the volunteer programs are effective, MACA will evaluate the following programs bi-annually (Milestone 2):

  • Volunteer Development Fund;
  • NWT Outstanding Volunteer Awards;
  • Non-Government Organization Stabilization Fund; and
  • Community Volunteer Recognition Fund.

The Volunteer Recognition Policy came into effect in 2013. It allows for contributions of up to $1,000 per community government related to hosting community volunteer recognition events. Contributions through this policy, by application, are distributed directly to community governments to encourage and promote community volunteerism through planned community recognition events. The Volunteer Recognition Fund  provides $30,000 annually to NWT community governments to support these recognition events.

NWT Outstanding Volunteer Awards are awarded annually to recognize the voluntary achievements and contributions made by volunteers in NWT communities in four categories: youth, individual, elder, and group. Every year the Department advertises for nominations for the Outstanding Volunteer Awards. In 2017, the Department recognized the 25th Anniversary of the OVA program including the nomination of over 932 individuals and groups for these awards from 1991-2016. MACA completed an evaluation of the OVA program in 2017 (Milestone 3), the results of which are being used to improve the program (Milestone 4).

The NGO Stabilization Fund for a part of the Department’s Volunteer Support Initiative. Recognizing that NGOs deliver essential services that support GNWT policy objectives, the GNWT established the NGO Stabilization Fund in 2009 to help stabilize crucial NGOs including organizations dealing with critical programming, for example homelessness, addictions services, or shelters for women and families. In 2016-2017, MACA distributed $350,000 under the NGO Stabilization Fund.

The NGO Policy was amended to ensure organizations dealing with critical programs and services that help ensure people’s basic needs for shelter and food are met (Milestone 1).

Annually, MACA distributes $70,000 under the Volunteer Development Fund (Milestone 5),

Links to Other Government Activities:

N/A

For more information about this initiative, please contact the Department of Municipal and Community Affairs.

Continue implementing Volunteer Development Fund and Community Volunteer Recognititon Program
Amend NGO Policy
Begin evaluating volunteer programs bi-annually
Evaluate Outstanding Volunteer Awards program
Revise Outstanding Volunteer Awards program based on evaluation results
 
4.3.12
We will reduce poverty in the NWT by implementing the GNWT commitments in the Territorial Anti-Poverty Action Plan, continuing to work with our partners to advance the plan and supporting communities’ priorities for wellness. (ongoing)
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.12 – We will reduce poverty in the NWT by implementing the GNWT commitments in the Territorial Anti-Poverty Action Plan, continuing to work with our partners to advance the plan and supporting communities’ priorities for wellness.

Work with community-based partners
Continue to implement GNWT commitments in Anti-Poverty Action Plan
 
4.3.13
In collaboration with residents, Aboriginal governments, community governments and other stakeholders, we will develop and implement the policy, program and legislative regimes necessary to support the legalization of cannabis in the Northwest Territories.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.13 – In collaboration with residents, Aboriginal governments, community governments and other stakeholders, we will develop and implement the policy, program and legislative regimes necessary to support the legalization of cannabis in the Northwest Territories.

In April 2017, the federal government introduced legislation that would set a framework for legalizing, regulating and restricting access to cannabis. All provinces and territories must decide how they will address a number of issues including: minimum age for purchase and consumption, the model for sales and distribution, public consumption, drug-impaired driving, and impairment in the workplace.

In May 2017, Executive Council approved the following principles to guide the GNWTs response to the legalization of cannabis:

  • Restrict youth access to cannabis, and protect young people from promotion or enticements to use cannabis;

  • allow adults to possess and access regulated, quality controlled legal cannabis;

  • discourage drug-impaired driving;

  • protect workers and the public from drug-impairment in the workplace;

  • protect public health by controlling the public smoking of cannabis;

  • enhance public awareness of the health risks associated with cannabis;

  • provide a safe and secure retail regime for the adult purchase of cannabis; and

  • provide for local options to establish cannabis distribution and consumption restrictions and prohibitions.

GNWT departments with responsibilities relating to cannabis are working to ensure that programs, policies and regulations are developed and put into place by July 2018. Steps include conducting public engagement on the legalization of cannabis (Milestone 1), releasing a report on the results of the GNWT’s public engagement (Milestone 2), developing a legislative proposal (Milestone 3), publically releasing the GNWT’s proposed approach to regulating cannabis (Milestone 4), and introducing a Bill to support the legalization of cannabis in the NWT (Milestone 5).

Conduct public engagement on the legalization of cannabis
Release report on the results of the GNWT's public engagement
Develop legislative proposal to support the legalization of cannabis for Cabinet approval
Release GNWT's proposed approach to regulating cannabis
Introduce Bill to support the legalization of cannabis in the NWT
 
4.3.14
We will work with all relevant stakeholders, including non-government organizations from the disabilities sector, to complete the NWT disability review and develop a strategic framework and five-year action plan to ensure effective supports and programs are in place for persons with disabilities.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.3.14: We will work with all relevant stakeholders, including non-government organizations from the disabilities sector, to complete the NWT disability review and develop a strategic framework and five-year action plan to ensure effective supports and programs are in place for persons with disabilities.

In 2017-18 the Department developed a disability strategic framework and action plan. The following high-level priority areas for action have been identified by the GNWT Interdepartmental Working Group and the NGO External Reference Panel: income security/poverty prevention, education and awareness, transitional planning and supports during life transitions, universal design (built environment), living options, and caregiver supports, and daycare access for children and youth with disabilities.

 

Develop priorities with partners for Strategic Framework and Action Plan
Obtain feedback from non-government and government partners on draft Strategic Framework and Action Plan
Release Strategic Framework and Action Plan for Disabilities
Taking action on the crisis of family and community violence.
4.4.1
We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by:
 
Examining the feasibility of expanding the Domestic Violence Treatment Options Court beyond Yellowknife and Hay River.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.1 – We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by:
Examining the feasibility of expanding the Domestic Violence Treatment Options Court beyond Yellowknife and Hay River.

The Domestic Violence Treatment Options Court (DVTO Court) was implemented on March 24, 2011. It is an option for low-risk offenders who take responsibility for their actions (plead guilty), and agree to attend an eight-module program. Offenders are carefully screened, and are required to attend the 8-module program as ordered by the Court. Successful completion of the program is a mitigating factor in sentencing. Support for victims is available, and may be coordinated through Victim Services. Victim safety is always a key consideration.

The DVTO Court is an initiative advanced by the Territorial Court, with support from the Department of Justice, the NWT Regional Office of the Public Prosecution Service of Canada (PPSC), the Defence Bar, and the RCMP.

The DVTO is offered in Yellowknife and Hay River, and is also available to offenders from Behchokǫ̀, K’atl’odeeche and Enterprise. Any decision to further expand DVTO Court would ultimately be made by the judiciary of the Territorial Court, and would need to take into consideration the availability of other supports and programming in any community being considered.

Steps to expand DVTO Court beyond Yellowknife and Hay River included monitoring and examining the feasibility of expanding to other communities (Milestone 1) and begin sittings of the DVTO Court in Behchokǫ̀ (Milestone 2).

Related Mandate Commitments:

  • Commitment 4.4.1 - We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by: Providing training, public information and outreach on protections provided under the Protection Against Family Violence Act.

  • Commitment 4.4.1 - We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by: Continuing the support for a healing program for men who use violence in intimate relationships such as the Wek’eahkaa A New Day Healing Program.

Monitor program and examine feasibility of expanding to other communities
Begin sittings of the Domestic Violence Treatment Options Court in Behchoko
 
Providing training, public information and outreach on the protections provided under the Protection Against Family Violence Act.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.1 – We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by:
Providing training, public information and outreach on the protections provided under the Protection Against Family Violence Act.

The Protection Against Family Violence Act came into force in 2005. The intent of this legislation is to provide emergency and long-term protection for victims of family violence. The Act also allows emergency access to assist a person who may be the subject of family violence.

The Department of Justice provides training, public information and outreach on the protections provided under the Act as follows:

  • Annual training for RCMP detachment commanders, shelter staff, community justice coordinators, and victim services workers.

  • Public information and outreach events through community wellness fairs.

  • Public information materials about family violence and legal tools to protect victims are distributed to all communities every year.

The Department of Justice has updated public information on the Act and will continue to meet regularly with the YWCA and RCMP to discuss ongoing work related to implementing the Act, with a focus on outreach and training (Milestone 1).

Related Mandate Commitments:

  • Commitment 4.4.1: We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by: Examining the feasibility of expanding DVTO Court beyond Yellowknife and Hay River.

  • Commitment 4.4.1 - We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by: Continuing the support for a healing program for men who use violence in intimate relationships such as the Wek’eahkaa A New Day Healing Program.

Provide updated public information and training
 
Supporting five family violence shelters across the NWT, including support for the overall capacity of the people who work in these shelters.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.1: We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by:

  • Supporting five family violence shelters across the NWT, including support for the overall capacity of the people who work in these shelters
  • Providing funding to develop family violence protocols and response teams in regions with no shelters
  • Supporting programming for children who have witnessed violence
  • Continuing to implement ‘What Will it Take?’, the social marketing campaign on family violence

In addition to supports for at-risk children and families through Building Stronger Families action plan, the Department continues to work in collaboration with the Department of Justice (DOJ) to strengthen initiatives and partnerships to reduce and prevent family violence. The Department supports five family violence shelters across the NWT. This includes support for the capacity of the people who work in these shelters through the Shelter Support Network. In regions without shelters, the Department provides support through the development of family violence protocols and response teams.

Through the “What Will It Take?” social marketing campaign, the Department will continue to deliver workshops, toolkits, and public service announcements aimed at encouraging bystanders to step in. This will be enhanced with a focused media campaign aimed at dispelling commonly held myths about family violence.

Continue to provide funding and programming support for shelters
Continue to provide funding and programming support for shelters
Continue to provide funding and programming support for shelters
Continue to provide funding and programming support for shelters
 
Providing funding to develop family violence protocols and response teams in regions with no shelters. (ongoing)
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.1: We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by:

  • Supporting five family violence shelters across the NWT, including support for the overall capacity of the people who work in these shelters
  • Providing funding to develop family violence protocols and response teams in regions with no shelters
  • Supporting programming for children who have witnessed violence
  • Continuing to implement ‘What Will it Take?’, the social marketing campaign on family violence

In addition to supports for at-risk children and families through Building Stronger Families action plan, the Department continues to work in collaboration with the Department of Justice (DOJ) to strengthen initiatives and partnerships to reduce and prevent family violence. The Department supports five family violence shelters across the NWT. This includes support for the capacity of the people who work in these shelters through the Shelter Support Network. In regions without shelters, the Department provides support through the development of family violence protocols and response teams.

Through the “What Will It Take?” social marketing campaign, the Department will continue to deliver workshops, toolkits, and public service announcements aimed at encouraging bystanders to step in. This will be enhanced with a focused media campaign aimed at dispelling commonly held myths about family violence.

Continue to support Dehcho protocol implementation
Establish protocols in the Sahtu and Tlicho regions
 
Supporting programming for children who have witnessed violence.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.1: We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by:

  • Supporting five family violence shelters across the NWT, including support for the overall capacity of the people who work in these shelters
  • Providing funding to develop family violence protocols and response teams in regions with no shelters
  • Supporting programming for children who have witnessed violence
  • Continuing to implement ‘What Will it Take?’, the social marketing campaign on family violence

In addition to supports for at-risk children and families through Building Stronger Families action plan, the Department continues to work in collaboration with the Department of Justice (DOJ) to strengthen initiatives and partnerships to reduce and prevent family violence. The Department supports five family violence shelters across the NWT. This includes support for the capacity of the people who work in these shelters through the Shelter Support Network. In regions without shelters, the Department provides support through the development of family violence protocols and response teams.

Through the “What Will It Take?” social marketing campaign, the Department will continue to deliver workshops, toolkits, and public service announcements aimed at encouraging bystanders to step in. This will be enhanced with a focused media campaign aimed at dispelling commonly held myths about family violence.

Continue to provide programs in Yellowknife, Hay River and Fort Smith
Continue to provide programs in Yellowknife, Hay River and Fort Smith
Continue to provide programs in Yellowknife, Hay River and Fort Smith
 
Continuing to implement ‘What Will it Take?’, the social marketing campaign on family violence.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.1: We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by:

  • Supporting five family violence shelters across the NWT, including support for the overall capacity of the people who work in these shelters
  • Providing funding to develop family violence protocols and response teams in regions with no shelters
  • Supporting programming for children who have witnessed violence
  • Continuing to implement ‘What Will it Take?’, the social marketing campaign on family violence

In addition to supports for at-risk children and families through Building Stronger Families action plan, the Department continues to work in collaboration with the Department of Justice (DOJ) to strengthen initiatives and partnerships to reduce and prevent family violence. The Department supports five family violence shelters across the NWT. This includes support for the capacity of the people who work in these shelters through the Shelter Support Network. In regions without shelters, the Department provides support through the development of family violence protocols and response teams.

Through the “What Will It Take?” social marketing campaign, the Department will continue to deliver workshops, toolkits, and public service announcements aimed at encouraging bystanders to step in. This will be enhanced with a focused media campaign aimed at dispelling commonly held myths about family violence.

Continue to implement social marketing campaign (ongoing
 
Continuing the support for a healing program for men who use violence in intimate relationships such as the Wek’eahkaa A New Day Healing Program.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.1 – We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by:
Continuing the support for a healing program for men who use violence in intimate relationships such as the Wek’eahkaa A New Day Healing Program.

A New Day is a healing program for men over the age of 18 who have a history of violence in their intimate relationships. The program teaches men new ways to improve their relationships with their partners and families. It is designed to be completed in 20 weekly two-hour sessions in classes of 6 to 10 men.

The A New Day healing program is operated under contract. It uses the same curriculum that was tested during a three-year pilot period, with minor scheduling changes to make it easier for men to get into and stay in the program. Men who are interested in taking the program can contact the John Howard Society for an appointment with a counselor. Their office is on the second floor of the Coldwell Banker building in Yellowknife.

The Department of Justice continues to support this program. Steps undertaken to fulfill this commitment included the completion of an evaluation of the pilot program (Milestone 1) and revising the program based on the evaluation results (Milestone 2).

Related Mandate Commitments:

  • Commitment 4.4.1 - We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by: Providing training, public information and outreach on protections provided under the Protection Against Family Violence Act.

  • Commitment 4.4.1: We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by: Examining the feasibility of expanding DVTO Court beyond Yellowknife and Hay River.

Complete evaluation of A New Day Healing Program
Revise program based on evaluation results
 
4.4.2
We will support the RCMP and communities in their efforts to strengthen partnerships to prevent and respond to violence by supporting the development of policing action plans in each community in accordance with each community’s priorities.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.2 – We will support the RCMP and communities in their efforts to strengthen partnerships to prevent and respond to violence by supporting the development of policing action plans in each community in accordance with each community’s priorities.

Every year, the RCMP and communities work collaboratively to develop local policing plans. Policing plans consider local needs, the resources available and collaborative strategies to address priority community safety issues.

Working together on action plans enhances communication and increases the level of commitment toward achieving local goals. Communities benefit from this process by being active partners and having a direct role in making their community a safer place to live. The action plan lays out the activities to be done by the RCMP and the community in response to the priorities. Quarterly reports provide information on progress toward achieving the goals and priorities, and allow for any adjustments to be made to actions where necessary.

Since 2015-16, all 33 communities have been participating in the setting of annual policing priorities with the RCMP. Each year, policing priorities and plans are re-visited and revised as deemed necessary by the community and the RCMP. While all 33 communities have a Policing Priorities Action Plan, those communities that do not have detachments are a priority in the policing plan process.

The Department of Justice and the RCMP continue to work together to evaluate the implementation of policing plans and analyze trends. This information is shared with communities and help to refine the planning process and identify common themes that may benefit from a more territorial approach.

Milestones established for this mandate commitment include the development of annual policing action plans for each community.

Related Mandate Commitments:

  • Commitment 4.4.1 - We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence by: Providing training, public information and outreach on protections provided under the Protection Against Family Violence Act.

Minister's policing priorities for RCMP released
Policing plans developed for all communities
Policing plans developed for all communities
Policing plans developed for all communities
 
4.4.3
We will seek to improve access to justice in the NWT, by expanding community legal outreach programs, making family law duty counsel services available to assist self-represented family members on first appearance in family court, and expanding public education on programs and services so that people know what help is out there and how to access it.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.3 – We will seek to improve access to justice in the NWT, by expanding community legal outreach programs, making family law duty counsel services available to assist self-represented family members on first appearance in family court, and expanding public education on programs and services so that people know what help is out there and how to access it.

In March 2017, the Legal Aid Commission formally expanded the Outreach program, including enhanced operating hours for the “walk-in” clinic, increased community visits for the Outreach lawyer, and the addition of family law duty counsel services. Family law duty counsel services offer “same appearance” support to individuals appearing in Supreme Court Family Law Chambers, without any need to apply and qualify for legal aid.

The Outreach Legal Aid Clinic operates from separate offices in Yellowknife. In addition to the baseline services provided in Yellowknife, there is a regular schedule of community visits and community based activities. This schedule is developed three to six months in advance and takes into account community needs and available resources.

Legal Aid Outreach services are offered in person in most communities, often in partnership with community organizations and Indigenous governments. Individuals who need assistance can contact the Community Legal Aid Clinic by email or telephone, or by stopping by in person when in Yellowknife. There is an afternoon drop-in clinic at the Community Legal Aid Clinic every Tuesday. Court workers will also refer cases to the clinic.

The Department of Justice is also taking additional measures to provide ongoing access to legal resources. With the planned closure of the M.M. de Weerdt Law Library, a Resource Centre in the Courthouse - available to both the Bar and the public - will be established. The Resource Centre will have a select collection of hardcopy materials, a terminal for free online access, and scheduled periods where staff support will be provided to assist members of the public to navigate the hardcopy and online resources. The Department is also making more public legal education materials available on its website. This work continues, in collaboration between the Legal Aid Commission and the Department of Justice.

Steps undertaken to improve access to justice in the NWT include implementing the expanded Legal Aid Outreach services (Milestone 1) and opening an Outreach Legal Aid Clinic in Yellowknife (Milestone 2).

Related Mandate Commitments:

  • Commitment 4.32: We will explore options for expanding beyond Yellowknife, the Mediation and Parenting After Separation and Divorce Program.

Implement expanded Legal Aid Outreach services
Open Outreach Legal Aid Clinic in Yellowknife
 
4.4.4
We will improve our social response to crime reduction by examining and analyzing social indicators, conducting research on what works to reduce crime, and identifying any gaps in territorial programming.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.4 – We will improve our social response to crime reduction by examining and analyzing social indicators, conducting research on what works to reduce crime, and identifying any gaps in territorial programming.

According to the most recent 2015 crime statistics, the NWT had the highest overall crime rate, property crime rate and rate of ‘other’ Criminal Code offences in the country. It had the second highest violent crime rate. This trend remains unchanged from previous years.

A report released by Statistics Canada in 2015 entitled “Crime in Canada’s provincial north and the territories” showed that the northern regions of the provinces also have higher rates of crime than in the South, and some share similar socio-economic conditions with the Territories – low education, low income, high levels of substance abuse (particularly alcohol). In addition to the complicated and interwoven socio-economic factors that influence the rate of crime in the north, Indigenous populations are more likely to face social and economic disadvantages, resulting in more “risk behaviour” and contact with the criminal justice. Developing a better understanding of how these factors affect individuals in the NWT is essential to developing an effective, social response to crime.

The Department of Justice is undertaking an examination of social indicators and a review of existing research into what works to reduce crime (Milestone 1) with a report to be completed in early 2019 (Milestone 2). It is expected that this work will benefit from the lessons learned through the pan-territorial project “Building a Northern Evidence-based Approach to Crime Prevention”, the Integrated Case Management pilot project, and other crime reduction initiatives such as the Wellness Court.

Related Mandate Commitments:

  • Commitment 4.1.2: Taking into account mental health and addictions, we will look at innovative ways to prevent and reduce crime such as integrated case management, wellness courts, domestic violence treatment options courts, and culturally appropriate correctional programs.

Begin reseaching social indicators and crime reduction
Release research report on social indicators and crime reduction
 
4.4.5
We will implement the calls to action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that fall within the jurisdiction of the territorial government, especially related to violence against indigenous women and girls. (ongoing)
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.5 – We will implement the calls to action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that fall within the jurisdiction of the territorial government, especially related to violence against indigenous women and girls.

On June 2, 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission released ‘Honouring the Truth, Reconciling for the Future – the Summary of the Final Report’ and within that report, 94 recommendations as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action to help redress the legacy of residential schools in Canada and advance the process of reconciliation. On December 15, 2015, the TRC released its final report.

In October 2015, the GNWT tabled its initial response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action report in the Legislative Assembly. The response acknowledged that more can be done and commits the GNWT to work with NWT residents and Indigenous governments, and partners throughout Canada, to encourage positive and concrete steps forward along the path of reconciliation.

"Meeting the Challenge of Reconciliation: The Government of the Northwest Territories Response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action" highlights the many steps that the GNWT has already taken to strengthen relationships with Indigenous peoples, help restore and heal Indigenous communities, and ensure that Indigenous cultures and traditions are recognized and valued.

Related Mandate Commitments

  • Commitment 4.4.1 – We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence
  • Commitment 4.4.2 – We will support the RCMP and communities in their efforts to strengthen partnerships to prevent and respond to violence by supporting the development of policing action plans in each community in accordance with each community’s priorities.
  • Commitment 4.4.3 – We will seek to improve access to justice in the NWT, by expanding community legal outreach programs, making family law duty counsel services available to assist self-represented family members on first appearance in family court, and expanding public education on programs and services so that people know what help is out there and how to access it.
  • Commitment 4.4.4 – We will improve our social response to crime reduction by examining and analyzing social indicators, conducting research on what works to reduce crime, and identifying any gaps in territorial programming.
  • Commitment 4.4.6 – We will support and participate in a National Round Table and National Inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women in collaboration with families, Indigenous governments, the federal government, and other organizations.
  • Commitment 4.4.7 – We will implement a territorial 9-1-1 program, including establishing new territorial legislation to help manage and govern the system.

For more information about this initiative, please contact the Department of Executive and Indigenous Affairs.

Develop GNWT implementation plan
Begin to implement Calls to Action
Release GNWT Implementation plan
 
4.4.6
We will support and participate in a National Round Table and National Inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women in collaboration with families, Aboriginal governments, the federal government, and other organizations.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.6 – We will support and participate in a National Round Table and National Inquiry into Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women in collaboration with families, Aboriginal governments, the federal government, and other organizations.

In 2013, all provincial/territorial Premiers supported the call by the NAO leaders to launch a national public inquiry into the missing or murdered Indigenous women and girls. In November 2014, the 17th Legislative Assembly passed motion supporting the call for a national inquiry.

The Department of Executive and Indigenous Affairs, in collaboration with other GNWT departments, will support the GNWT’s participation in the National Inquiry. An interdepartmental working group has been established to guide this work which will include collaboration with Aboriginal governments and other stakeholders.

The GNWT will continue to participate in a Federal-Provincial-Territorial Working Group that has been established to support the National Inquiry.

Related Mandate Commitments

  • Commitment 4.4.1 – We will strengthen initiatives and partnerships to prevent and reduce family violence
  • Commitment 4.4.2 – We will support the RCMP and communities in their efforts to strengthen partnerships to prevent and respond to violence by supporting the development of policing action plans in each community in accordance with each community’s priorities.
  • Commitment 4.4.3 – We will seek to improve access to justice in the NWT, by expanding community legal outreach programs, making family law duty counsel services available to assist self-represented family members on first appearance in family court, and expanding public education on programs and services so that people know what help is out there and how to access it.
  • Commitment 4.4.4 – We will improve our social response to crime reduction by examining and analyzing social indicators, conducting research on what works to reduce crime, and identifying any gaps in territorial programming.
  • Commitment 4.4.5 – We will implement the calls to action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that fall within the jurisdiction of the territorial government, especially related to violence against indigenous women and girls.
  • Commitment 4.4.7 – We will implement a territorial 9-1-1 program, including establishing new territorial legislation to help manage and govern the system.

For more information about this initiative, please contact the Department of Executive and Indigenous Affairs.

Participate in 2nd National Roundtable
Federal Government launches National Inquiry
Begin participation in National Inquiry
Fedreral National Inquiry Preliminary Report
Federal National Inquiry Final Report
 
4.4.7
We will implement a territorial 9-1-1 program, including establishing new territorial legislation to help manage and govern the system.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.4.7 – We will implement a territorial 9-1-1 program, including establishing new territorial legislation to help manage and govern the system.

Background:

9-1-1 is the three-digit telephone number in North America that facilitates the reporting of an emergency requiring response by a public safety agency such as search and rescue, police, firefighting or ambulance services. The NWT 9-1-1 program will integrate and/or connect citizens to pre-existing NWT services, beyond basic police, fire and ambulance services, such as suicide crisis intervention, Kids Help Phone, NWT Help Line, on-call social workers, child protection staff, wildfire reporting, and Spill Report Line.

NWT 9-1-1 will manage and integrate the NWT Public Alerting System (including AMBER alerts) into daily operations, providing citizens with critical information on emergencies in real time so they can take action to protect themselves, their loved ones and their property.

The foundational work for the project is contained in two reports completed by an interdepartmental committee and key stakeholders in 2015. MACA received start-up funding of $616,000 in the 2017-2018 GNWT Main Estimates. Ongoing operational costs will be managed through user fees.

The steps needed to establish a NWT 9-1-1 program include completion and implementation of program design (Milestone 1 & 2), development of a legislative proposal (Milestone 3), and introduction of a 9-1-1 legislative bill (Milestone 4) and regulations (Milestone 5). The program is expected to be launched across the NWT in 2019 (Milestone 6).

Links to Other Government Activities:

N/A

For more information about this initiative, please contact the Department of Municipal and Community Affairs.

Complete 9-1-1 Program Design
Develop legislative proposal to establish 9-1-1 program for Cabinet approval
Begin 9-1-1 Program set-up and system preparation
Introduce Bill to establish 9-1-1
Introduce 9-1-1 Regulation
Launch 9-1-1 service across NWT
Creating opportunities for healthy lifestyles and community leadership for our youth.
 
4.5.2
We will fund after-school programs that build physical literacy and resiliency among youth through the efficient delivery of the Children and Youth Resiliency Program.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.5.2 – We will fund after-school programs that build physical literacy and resiliency among youth through the efficient delivery of the Children and Youth Resiliency Program.

We will fund after-school programs that build physical literacy and resiliency among youth through the efficient delivery of the Children and Youth Resiliency Program.

Background:

The Children and Youth Resiliency Program (CYRP) was launched in 2014 to help communities start or expand programs that support mental health and physical activity.

Physical activity, sport and recreation programs are excellent ways to support the development of positive lifestyle and mental health choices for youth.

Front line children and youth program staff are often the first to notice and identify potential mental health problems and are in a position to identify and assist with mental health problems provided they have the proper training.

The Minister’s Forum on Addictions and Community Wellness identified a clear need for more quality youth programming to support mental wellness in youth. “It is a well-established fact that prevention and early intervention programs are more cost-effective in the long run than treatment programs are.”[1]

CYRP training includes Mental Health First Aid training as well as training in physical literacy and physical health and development.

The Children and Youth Resiliency Program provides funding to organizations that provide services to people under 25 years of age and children between the ages of 6-12 years of age.

The Children and Youth Resiliency Program will provide $15,000 in funding for each community in the NWT annually (Milestone 1). This funding will be available to community governments, education authorities, and organizations that provide services to children and youth.

To ensure MACA is efficiently delivering the CYRP, the Department will review the program in 2018 (Milestone 2).

Links to other activities

Education Renewal and Innovation Framework: Directions for Change

The Departments of Health and Social Services (HSS), Municipal and Community Affairs (MACA), Education and Education Culture and Employment (ECE) jointly developed the GNWT Healthy Choices Framework to support cross government goals in healthy living.

For more information about this initiative, please contact the Department of:

Education, Culture and Employment or Municipal and Community Affairs

[1] A Shared Path Towards Wellness, Mental Health and Addictions Plan, Page 13

Deliver Children and Youth Resiliency Program (ongoing
Review Children and Youth Resilency Program
 
4.5.4
We will build youth resiliency in schools by supporting school staff in using self-regulation instructional practices.
Background Note

COMMUNITY WELLNESS AND SAFETY

Commitment 4.5.4 – We will build youth resiliency in schools by supporting school staff in using self-regulation instructional practices.

The Department of Education, Culture and Employment (ECE) is working, with support from the Department of Health and Social Services (HSS), to develop a new JK-9 Health and Wellness curriculum. The approach taken in this curriculum shifts from the teacher delivering information, to students researching questions of real impact to their lives. This approach is an integral part of building student engagement, resiliency, and wellness.

The updated JK-9 Health and Wellness curriculum aims to explore mental health, healthy relationships, the physical changes that young people experience through puberty, the use and abuse of alcohol and other substances. Strategies related to self-regulation (SR) and resiliency will be important elements of the approach that students will learn in taking ownership of their health and wellness.

During the 2016-17 school year, the development of a draft grades 4-6 curriculum was completed, and a small-scale pilot of selected components was undertaken (milestone 1).During the 2017-2018 school year this draft grades 4-6 curriculum is being piloted by teachers from all regions throughout the territory with full implementation beginning in the 2018-2019 school year.

Development of the grades 7-9 curriculum is currently being completed during the current 2017-18 school year (milestone 2) and development of the JK-3 curriculum will be undertaken in the 2018-19 school year (milestone 3).

In addition to this curriculum development, other work is being done to support the use of SR strategies in NWT classrooms. Over a two school year period (2015-2017), every region received intensive SR support and capacity building focused in the selected target school of their choice. All school principals have been invited to apply for SR implementation support that can take various forms - from on-site support, to funding for SR resources, to staff professional development.

Since 2015, all NWT educators have had access to the following:

  • free online courses in mindfulness (foundational for SR);
  • a territorial SR-themed online book club;
  • monthly SR capacity building webinars where schools have had a chance to share their promising SR practices with each other; and
  • each region has been invited to send staff to a summer SR symposium.

The strong participation of NWT educators in accessing these professional supports and resources speaks volumes to how important SR is to them in meeting the needs of their students.

Related Mandate Commitments:

Commitment 2.2.1: We will implement the Education Renewal and Innovation framework by:

  • Implementing the renewed K12 Inclusive Schooling Directive which provides greater direction on roles and responsibilities, increases the number of Program Support Teachers, increases emphasis on training and increases accountability
  • Implementing a renewed Aboriginal Language and Culture-based Education Directive in order to strengthen the role of schools in supporting Aboriginal language development and incorporate culture in programming
  • Implementing a comprehensive accountability framework for the JK-12 education system with integrated program and financial reporting processes
  • Developing options to increase the approaches available to students that lead to graduation, to improve graduation rates, and to provide greater linkages to post-secondary schooling
  • Expanding the NWT distance learning pilot project to increase access for NWT senior secondary students in all communities
  • Undertaking a planning study on options for shared service administration across NWT school boards
Pilot new health and wellness curriculum for grades 4-6
Pilot new health and wellness curriculum for grades 7-9
Pilot new health and wellness curriculum for grades JK-3